Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Serving foods as they’re harvested in season is one of the things I love most about Amish and Mennonite cooking. Because so many of their ingredients were grown in their own gardens, my grandmothers cooked seasonally long before it was in style to do so. Acorn squash is a signature vegetable of Autumn, so I’m excited to share this Stuffed, Roasted Acorn Squash recipe with you today.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale and Goat Cheese

The recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook is very simple, so I decided to change it up a little, roasting the squash instead of simply baking it, and adding Kale, Onions, Red Peppers and Goat Cheese.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Begin by cutting the squash in half (in whichever direction you choose), and clean out the seeds.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Drizzle the squash with olive oil and honey, and sprinkle with sea salt, fresh ground pepper and a tiny bit of sage.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Place face up in roasting pan or on a cookie tray, and bake for 30-45 minutes, or until squash is tender.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

While squash is baking, brown sausage in skillet.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Slice kale, and dice onion and red peppers.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

When sausage is browned, remove from skillet and add vegetables. Cook for 7-10 minutes, or until tender.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Combine sausage and vegetables, taste and season with salt and pepper if desired, and add goat cheese. Stir together.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Spoon sausage mixture into roasted acorn squash, sprinkle with goat cheese, and serve!

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 acorn squash
  • Approximately 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
  • Approximately 2 Tablespoons Honey
  • Dash of Sea Salt for each squash
  • Fresh ground pepper for each squash
  • Slight sprinkle of ground sage for each squash
  • Filling: 1 pound turkey sausage
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 bunch kale, sliced thin
  • 1 small red pepper, diced
  • 1 small sweet onion, diced
  • 5 ounces goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Cut squash in half, spoon out seeds.
  3. Place face up in roasting pan or cookie tray.
  4. Drizzle with olive oil and honey.
  5. Sprinkle with sea salt, fresh ground pepper, and a bit of ground sage.
  6. Place in oven. (Uncovered.)
  7. Brown sausage in skillet coated with olive oil or butter.
  8. Slice/chop/dice; kale, red peppers, onions and garlic.
  9. When sausage is browned, remove from skillet, drizzle skillet with olive oil or 1/2 TBS of butter, and place vegetables in skillet. Sauté till tender - about 10 minutes.
  10. Add meat, and crumble in half of the the goat cheese. Stir until combined.
  11. Remove squash from oven when tender. (Should be easily pierced with fork.)
  12. Spoon sausage filling into squash.
  13. Crumble remaining goat cheese on top. Place under broiler for a few minutes of desired (not necessary), and serve.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Meet “Fried Cornmeal Mush”, a crispy and delicious breakfast food that forms a perfect union of my little family’s American, Italian, Texan and Amish roots.

I have sweet memories of my Grussmommy Barbara Glick-Dienner (who lived in Lancaster County, PA), cutting slices of the cornmeal mush she had prepared the day before, and chilled overnight. She fried them to perfection in her well-seasoned, cast iron skillet, and served the fried cornmeal mush to her family for breakfast. We topped it with Maple Syrup, and enjoyed every bite of the buttery-crisp on the outside, while tasty-soft on the inside, hearty breakfast food.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

My mother made this food for my siblings and me, growing up in East Texas. We loved it! Although I always viewed it as an “Amish” food, I learned that Cornmeal Mush was not only an Early American, and Amish standby – it was equally as popular in Southern cooking. There are recipes for Cornmeal Mush from New England, Austin, Texas and a Jewish Cookbook from New York, all dating back to one-hundred years ago or more. The recipe I’m sharing today is actually adapted from the Laura Ingalls Wilder-inspired “Little House Cookbook”, as Cornmeal Mush was also commonly served in Pioneer homes.

“One of the early foods enjoyed by early colonists and settlers to America was corn meal mush. The newcomers learned to make and eat this from the native American Indians. Indians had been grinding corn for centuries making all kinds of dishes.

Hot cereal was known for years in other parts of the world. It went under various names, as porridge, hasty pudding and lobiolly. Thus, during the decades of European settlement of America, mush made from cornmeal became the usual breakfast and supper dish.” – America Civil War History Forums 

As I’m married to a wonderful Italian man who also has a rich family food-culture history, I adore Italy’s version of Cornmeal Mush; Polenta. In our house today, my girls love both versions. I enjoyed reading this fascinating article by the New York Times, on the commonalities of America’s Cornmeal Mush, and Italy’s Polenta, where they call Polenta the “Cornmeal Mush with a Little Italian Accent”. We typically prepare our fried version of Polenta in olive oil, while we use butter for fried Cornmeal Mush.

Although Mennonite Community Cookbook’s version of this recipe calls for flour, I used the traditional method from “The Little House Cookbook”, and another cookbook I love called “Wholesome Home Cooking“. They both call for the traditional 4 cups of water to 1 cup of stoneground cornmeal ratio that my mother uses in her kitchen.

So much to say, about a humble little dish! Here’s the recipe-lowdown.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Begin preparations one day in advance, by preparing your Cornmeal Mush. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil, and add salt. In a separate dish, combine additional 1 cup of water with cornmeal, and whisk together until smooth. Slowly add the corn mixture to the water, whisking briskly to keep it smooth.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Simmer over low heat for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Spread into a small, shallow dish or loaf pan. Cover and allow to cool in refrigerator for several hours or overnight.
Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

When cool, remove from pan and slice about 3/8 inches thick.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Your cornmeal-mush is ready to pan-fry!

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Coat bottom of cast iron skillet with butter, lard or olive oil.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Fry on both sides until golden brown, and slightly crisp on the outside.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Serve with butter and syrup, with ketchup, or plain. Yum, yum, yum!

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Yield: 4-6 servings

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cornmeal (preferably organic and stoneground)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 cups water

Instructions

  1. Bring 3 cups of the water to a boil in a (3 quart or larger) kettle.
  2. Stir in the salt.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of water and the cornmeal, till smooth.
  4. Reduce heat, and slowly add the cornmeal mixture to the hot water, whisking briskly to avoid lumps.
  5. Increase burner heat and bring back to a boil, stirring constantly.
  6. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Stirring several times. The cornmeal mush consistency will resemble that of cooked oatmeal.
  7. To make the Fried Cornmeal Mush, place the mixture in a loaf pan or shallow baking dish.
  8. Allow to cool for several hours or overnight.
  9. Slice approximately 3/8 inch thick.
  10. Coat bottom of a cast iron skillet with butter, lard, or olive oil, and fry on both sides until golden-brown.

Notes

Recipe sources: Wholesome Home Cooking, Katie Stoltzfus & Whitmore Printing; The Little House Cookbook, Barbara Walker & Harper Collins Publishers; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

References:

The Food Timeline

The New York Times, on Cornmeal Mush and Polenta

Wholesome Home Cooking

The Little House Cookbook

 

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Although it’s not what most Americans would call “Pot Pie”, this traditional Pennsylvania Dutch Chicken stew with homemade noodles, is the first thing that comes to mind when talking about Pot Pie, with anyone from the Amish culture.

“Chicken Pot Pie” is the ultimate, hearty, comfort food, with its savory, made-from-scratch chicken broth base, loaded with chunks of tender chicken, potatoes, and thick, dumpling-like, square noodles. It is often served at local fundraisers in Amish-influenced communities, and is always a crowd pleaser.

The first mention of “Noodles” was in German cookbooks from the 1400’s, and as Amish-Mennonite cooking is steeped with German traditions, the noodles in this pot pie are the quintessential mark of its German origins.

I have fond memories of helping my Mama de-bone the cooked chicken, roll out the stiff dough, and cut it into beautiful diamonds. While teaching my girls how to make it, their favorite part of the process was making the noodles.

Some recipes call for the addition of carrots, onions and celery, and other herbs and spices. Although they are all delicious additions, I followed the traditional Mennonite Community Cookbook’s ingredient list, and kept our Chicken Pot Pie very simple while teaching my girls how to make it.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by placing a whole chicken in a large pot, and cover it with water. Cook for about 1 1/2 hours, or until chicken begins falling off the bones. Cool, and remove from broth. De-bone chicken and cut into large chunks. Strain broth and place back into pot. Add chicken and salt. Bring to simmer over low heat.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

To make noodles, place flour and eggs into mixer bowl.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Mix, using dough hook attachment.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add cream, one tablespoon at a time, until dough forms.
Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Shape into circle, and place on floured surface, ready to roll. You can see my daughter had fun with this step. 🙂

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Peel and slice potatoes.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add potatoes to chicken broth. Cover so they can soften while you finish the noodles.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Roll out dough until very thin – about 1/8 of an inch.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Cut into one-inch or larger pieces. My mother always formed diamond-shaped noodles, which I think are beautiful.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bring simmering broth mixture to a low boil. Slowly add noodles, one at a time so as to avoid them sticking together. Cook over medium heat, for 20 minutes.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Chop fresh parsley…

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

…add to pot pie.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

…and serve to your family and friends!

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours

Yield: 8 servings

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • One 4-6 pound chicken
  • Water - enough to cover chicken in cooking pot
  • 1-2 teaspoons sea salt, based on personal preference
  • Fresh-craked black pepper to taste
  • 5 medium potatoes, sliced
  • 2-3 Tablespoons fresh, chopped parsley
  • Potpie dough: 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4-6 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream

Instructions

  1. Place whole chicken in a large pot, and cover it with water.
  2. Cook for about 1 1/2 hours, or until chicken begins falling off the bones.
  3. Cool, and remove from broth.
  4. Debone chicken and cut into large chunks.
  5. Strain broth and place back into pot.
  6. Add chopped chicken, salt, and pepper.
  7. Bring to simmer over low heat.
  8. To make noodles, place flour, salt and eggs into mixer bowl.
  9. Mix for about one minute, using dough hook attachment.
  10. Turn mixer on low speed, and add heavy cream, 1 tablespoon at a time until ball of dough forms.
  11. Shape dough into circle, and place on floured surface.
  12. *(At this time, Peel and slice potatoes. Add potatoes to simmering broth and allow them to cook for 20 minutes while finishing up the noodles.)
  13. Roll very thin (about 1/8 inch thickness), and slice into 1-inch or larger diamonds or squares.
  14. Bring simmering broth mixture to low boil, slowly add noodles, one at a time so as to avoid them sticking together.
  15. Cook for 20 minutes, over medium heat.
  16. Chop parsley, add to Pot Pie, and serve.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Harvey Stover, Mrs. J.C. Clemens, Mrs. Amos Kreider; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Interesting link and source:

Bon Appetit’s “The Origin of the Word Noodle

The Washington Post, on Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine (including Chicken Pot Pie)

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Having grown up in Texas, my favorite condiment is of course, Salsa. But there’s another tomato specialty that ranks right up there at the top, and it is Homemade Ketchup. My Amish Grandmother (Barbara Glick-Dienner) made delicious ketchup, as did my Mama. There’s nothing that can compare to the  tangy, slightly sweet, full of fresh-garden-produce, flavorful goodness of this homemade sauce.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

I’ve modified the original recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook in several ways; first, making a smaller batch, and second, using canned tomato juice and tomato puree’ from the grocery store, as I don’t have access to half a bushel of fresh garden tomatoes at this time.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Begin by chopping the peppers, onions and celery into large pieces.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Place vegetables in a large pot, add 3 cups of water, and cook (over medium heat) for 3o minutes.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

When vegetables have softened, pour into blender along with water from pot, and puree’.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Combine tomato puree’ and tomato juice in same pot in which vegetables were cooked.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Pour vegetable puree’ through strainer, into tomato mixture.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Stir, and place on low to medium heat.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Measure spices.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Add vinegar, sugar and spices to pot. Stir well. Cook at a simmer for 30 minutes.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

Mix 2 tablespoons tapioca flour with 1/4 cup water in a small bowl, and stir till smooth. Add to tomato mixture, and stir well. Bring ketchup to a boil, then reduce heat and allow to thicken for 15 minutes.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes}

If you want to preserve any of your ketchup, place new canning lids in simmering water, and sterilize pint jars with boiling water. Pour hot ketchup into jars and make sure tops are clean. Place canning lids on top, and finish with canning jar rings. Give your jars a “Water-bath” in canner for 15 minutes. Test jar lids by gently pressing the center in 24 hours to ensure they have sealed. If you hear a popping noise when you apply pressure, the jar has not sealed properly and should be kept in the refrigerator.

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Enjoy your Homemade Ketchup in all the usual ways you would use the “store-bought” version!

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes} ~ Quick Method

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 7 pints

Homemade Ketchup {Amish Family Recipes} ~ Quick Method

Ingredients

  • 1 quart tomato juice
  • 32 ounces tomato puree'
  • 1 red Bell pepper and 1 green Bell pepper
  • 1 onion
  • 5 stalks celery, including leaves
  • 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cups raw sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper + *a dash of cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 4 cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 2 rounded Tablespoon tapioca starch (aka tapioca flour)

Instructions

  1. Chop peppers and onions into quarters.
  2. Place in pot with 2 cups water and cook for 30 minutes. Remove from pot and puree for 1 minute in blender.
  3. Pour tomato juice and puree' in pot used to cook vegetables.
  4. Add liquid from strained vegetables.
  5. Add sugar, vinegar and spices.
  6. Bring to boil, turn down to low heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
  7. (*If canning ketchup, prepare canning jars and lids now.)
  8. Mix tapioca starch (aka tapioca flour) with enough water to make a paste. Stir into hot tomato mixture and heat on high until thickened, stirring constantly.
  9. Put in jars while boiling hot to self seal. Put lids on immediately.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes}

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soft and creamy with a hint of vanilla and a sprinkle of nutmeg – my Grandma Esh made the best Baked Cup Custard I ever tasted. It was always exciting to watch her mix the egg-thickened farm milk mixture, pour it into her beautiful, brown, earthenware custard cups, sprinkle each serving with nutmeg, place them in the oven in a dish of hot water, and then savor every bite of custard for dessert after it was baked.

I’ve heard Cup Custard (a simple dessert made with only five ingredients) called Creme Brûlée’s country cousin. Custard’s origins can be traced all the way back to Roman times, and Cup Custard is mentioned in French and Italian medieval literature. Cooks throughout Europe and the Americas adopted the method, including Amish and Mennonites who love to serve delicious desserts.

Putting the desert together is a relatively simple task, followed by about 45 minutes of baking. With its uncomplicated but delicious flavor, our entire family enjoys it!

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by heating the milk till it begins to steam – very hot, but not boiling.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Whisk eggs, add sugar, salt and vanilla and mix together.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add milk to egg mixture very slowly, whisking the entire time.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Pour into custard cups or ramekins.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Sprinkle with nutmeg.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Place custard cups in a baking dish, and pour hot water into the dish until it reaches approximately the level of the custard.

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bake at 325 for 45 minutes, or until an inserted knife comes out clean. This old-fashioned dessert may be served warm or chilled, and with or without whipped cream. Enjoy! 

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Yield: 8 custard cups

Baked Cup Custard {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 - 2/3 cup sugar (based on personal preference of less or more sweet.)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • Nutmeg (optional)

Instructions

  1. Beat eggs.
  2. Add sugar, salt and vanilla, whisk till combined.
  3. Scald milk - or heat till just below boiling point.
  4. Slowly pour hot milk into egg mixture while whisking to prevent eggs from cooking.
  5. Pour into custard cups, filling 2/3 - 3/4 full.
  6. Sprinkle with nutmeg if desired.
  7. Set cups in a baking dish or pan and pour hot water around them until it comes to the level of the custard.
  8. Bake at 325 approximately 45 minutes, or until a knife comes out clean when inserted in the center of the custard.
  9. Do not let water in pan boil.
  10. Serve with whipped cream if desired.
  11. Makes 8 custards.

Notes

Recipe source: Mabel Yoder and Mrs. I. Lapp; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Shepherd’s Pie is an ultimate comfort food with its flavorful and hearty meat base, and mounds of creamy, mashed potatoes on top, baked till just browned and delicious.

Although its origins are not Amish, I can see why the Amish community adopted the recipe, and placed it in the Mennonite Community Cookbook. The ingredients and flavors are simple and delicious, and it uses ingredients commonly found in their kitchens.

Meat and potato pies date back to medieval times, with roots in Great Britain. Shepherd’s Pie is a relative of its earlier cousin; Cottage Pie. Shepherd’s Pie was typically made with lamb or mutton, while Cottage Pie used beef.

“But in fact, cottage pie is a much older term than shepherd’s pie, which does not crop up until the 1870s. On 29 August 1791 we find that enthusiastic recorder of all his meals, the Reverend James Woodford, noting in his diary Dinner to day, Cottage-Pye and rost Beef’ (it is not clear precisely what he meant by cottage pie, however).”
—An A to Z of Food and Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002 (p. 92)

The earliest online reference I could find of Shepherd’s Pie in an American cookbook, was in “Philadelphia Mrs. Rorer’s Philadelphia Cook Book,” published in 1886. (www.FoodTimeline.org.)

The recipe listed in the Mennonite Community Cookbook is very simple, using the old-fashioned Shepherd’s Pie method of lining the bottom of the baking dish with potatoes, as well placing them on top. It doesn’t list amounts, rather calls for leftover meat, and a few additions. Today I’m sharing a recipe I’ve compiled from several – one that my entire family (with varying palates), enjoys very much! It can easily be modified and be made dairy and gluten-free. Although true Shepherd’s Pie often calls for cubed or chunks of meat, I love to use pasture-fed, organic ground beef from local farmers, because of the simplicity in cooking it. Happy eating!

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Gather potatoes, carrots, and an onion.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Peel and quarter all potatoes but three potatoes, and place in water. Salt them and cook, for the mashed potato topping on your Shepherd’s Pie. Peel the remaining three potatoes and cut into one inch squares. These will be used in the stew portion of your dish.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Chop onions and slice carrots.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Sprinkle with salt, and saute’ in with olive oil for three minutes. Remove from skillet.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Brown ground beef in same skillet.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Place browned ground beef, sautéed vegetables, diced potatoes, broth, tomato purée and seasonings in large pot. Bring to a simmer.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

While the stew is simmering, mash the potatoes.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

After Mashed Potatoes are ready, whisk together flour and water till smooth. Add to simmering stew.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Stir well and allow to thicken for several minutes. Place stew in buttered casserole dish, and top with mashed potatoes. Bake for 30 minutes, at 350.

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Yield: 8 servings

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3-5 carrots, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Salt, & Pepper to taste
  • 12 Russet potatoes (9 quartered and boiled for mashed potatoes, and 3 diced for stew base)
  • 32 ounces chicken broth
  • 15 ounces tomato puree
  • 1/8 teaspoon Thyme
  • 1/2 cup sweet, red cooking wine (optional)
  • For Mashed Potatoes: 1/2 cup butter, and 1/2 cup or more of milk, cream or half and half

Instructions

  1. Peel and quarter all but three potatoes. Add 1 teaspoon salt and bring to boil. Cook on medium-low heat for 20 minutes, or until soft.
  2. Chop remaining three potatoes into one inch cubes.
  3. Chop onion and garlic, slice carrots.
  4. Heat olive oil in skillet, sprinkle with salt and saute vegetables for three minutes. Remove from skillet.
  5. Add one more tablespoon olive oil to pan. Brown meat in same skillet. Add 1 teaspoon salt.
  6. In large pot; place meat, vegetables, the three diced potatoes, chicken broth, tomato puree, thyme and optional red cooking wine. Bring to simmer. Cook for 30 minutes. Add more salt and fresh, cracked pepper if needed.
  7. Drain cooked potatoes. Beat till mashed. Add butter and mix well. Add cream and beat till smooth. Use reserved water from cooking potatoes if more liquid is needed.
  8. *If desired, whisk together 3/4 cup cold water and 1/3 cup all purpose flour till smooth, and add to stew mixture. Allow to simmer for a few minutes, to thicken.
  9. Butter bottom and sides of baking dish. Pour stew in bottom. Gently place mashed potatoes on top, spreading out to cover the meat.
  10. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes, or until slightly browned on top.

Interesting Links:

Jamie Oliver’s 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Shepherd’s Pie

Cook’s Info on Shepherd’s Pie

The Unexpected Origin of Shepherd’s Pie

References:

www.FoodTimeline.org

 

 

Butterscotch Squares, aka Naughty Bars {Amish Family Recipes}

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.comI’d like to introduce you to the simplest, most delicious bar cookie your taste buds will ever encounter,. Some people call them “Blondies”, or even better, “Naughty Bars”. If you look at recipes from the early 1900’s (or an Amish kitchen), their title was “Butterscotch Bars.” No matter what you call them, they are a sweet, delectable, golden, butter and sugary goodness, and I haven’t met a person who doesn’t love them. (Or who can eat just one.)

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

My dear friend Shannon (one of the most generous, hospitable and best home-chefs I know), made Penzey’s “Naughty Bars” for our family. We fell in love with them instantly. As I was going through the Mennonite Community Cookbook gathering from its pages some of our family’s favorite recipes, I saw the “Butterscotch Bars” recipe and realized it was exactly the same one Shannon had given me, except for one important measurement; the BUTTER. “Naughty Bars” call for exactly twice as much. 🙂

Whether you call them Butterscotch Bars, Blondies, or Naughty Bars, you’ll enjoy every bite. So, with no further ado, here’s the recipe Shannon shared with me:

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by beating together melted butter and brown sugar. Add baking powder, salt and vanilla, and mix well.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Slowly add the flour, mixing between each addition.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Whisk eggs, pour into mixture and mix well.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Spread into 9×13 pan, using a spatula.

Butterscotch Bars {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bake for 20-25 minutes. (Do not over-bake!) May be sliced while warm.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes}

Source: Penzey's Spices and the Mennonite Community Cookbook.

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks butter (1 cup)
  • 2 cups packed brown sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350, grease 9x13 pan.
  2. Combine melted butter and brown sugar.
  3. Add the baking powder, salt and vanilla, and mix well.
  4. Slowly add flour, mix well between each addition.
  5. Whisk eggs in separate bowl, then add to mixture and combine well.
  6. Spread into greased pan, using spatula.
  7. Bake at 350, for 20 - 30 minutes, or until edges are golden. Center will still be soft to touch.
  8. Serve alone, or with ice cream.

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes}

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

The things I most appreciate about Amish-Mennonite cooking are its use of simple, straightforward and real ingredients, the seasonal nature of the food, the wholesome food traditions they have managed to maintain in spite of our commercialized culture, and the way their cooking is a model example of hospitality and community – as it relates to food. Baked Limas are a delicious example of this!

This dish has roots in Early American, Greek and German cooking, among others. Giant Limas were relatively easy to dry at the end of summer’s gardening season, and were often prepared and served throughout the winter months – hot, or cold, with bread.

I love the slightly sweet, tangy flavor of Baked Limas, and I’ve taken the liberty to add the Greek’s use of garlic to my version of the Amish Community Cookbook’s recipe.

Although this dish is very easy to prepare, it does take some time, and requires soaking the beans overnight, in advance of cooking the next day.

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Soak the beans overnight by covering completely with water, after washing them thoroughly. The next morning, rinse them, place in Dutch oven or large pot, cover with fresh water and a bit of sea salt, and cook for 1 hour. (Till just tender, but not soft.) After cooking, drain the beans.

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Chop onions, green peppers and garlic. Sauté in olive oil for 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes and tomato purée, and seasonings. Cook for 30 minutes.

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Combine drained beans and the delicious tomato sauce you’ve just cooked. Taste and add more salt and/or fresh ground pepper if needed. (I like to add cayenne for a little kick.)

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Place bacon strips over the top of your beans. (Optional.)

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bake for 1 – 1 1/2 hours, or until beans are desired softness. Serve your Baked Limas as a side dish – or all on their own, with a hearty slice of wholesome bread. Delicious!

Baked Limas {Amish Family Recipes}

Cook Time: 2 hours

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried Giant Lima beans
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 green Bell pepper
  • 1 can plum tomatoes, chopped (keep juice)
  • 1 can tomato purée
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • Fresh ground pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar or honey
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped, fresh parsley
  • 4 slices bacon (optional)

Instructions

  1. Wash beans and cover with water (several inches over beans).soak overnight.
  2. Next morning, rinse beans, place in large pot, add 8 cups fresh water and 1 teaspoon salt.
  3. Cook for 1 hour, or until they're slightly tender, but not too soft.
  4. Heat olive oil in large skillet. Add onions, peppers and garlic. Sauté for 2-3 minutes.
  5. Add chopped tomatoes and tomato purée, all seasonings, and brown sugar or honey.
  6. Cook for 30 minutes, on medium-low heat.
  7. Combine with beans.
  8. Place in baking dish.
  9. Place bacon slices on top. (Optional.)
  10. Bake for 1 1/2 hours - 1 hour covered, and 30 minutes uncovered.
  11. Serve hot, or at room temperature.

Notes

Recipe modification from base recipe source: Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

 

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Cookies at Grandma’s house are one of every child’s favorite things, and I was no exception! During the holidays my Grandma Lydia made many varieties of delicious cookies for her family to enjoy. One of my favorite kinds was “Sand Tarts”. These are thin and crispy, with a delicious, simple flavor similar to a sugar cookie. My grandmother had lots of wonderful cookie cutter shapes she used for her Sand Tarts – including stars and candy canes, and she sprinkled them with colored sugar.

The origins of this cookie recipe are not clear, although everyone agrees they’re in the family of sugar cookies. Some say their name is derived from “Saint Heart” cookies (a sugar cookie made in the shape of a heart for Catholic holy days), and others say they are named “Sand Tart” because with their round shape, sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon, they resemble the ocean’s Sand Dollar. Some recipes call for lemon flavoring, and some call for an egg wash before baking, while others call for milk. Some recipes call for nuts, others do not. Regardless, this old-fashioned cookie is a wonderful holiday favorite of mine, and lots of fun to make! Today, I’m using the recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook. 

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by creaming the shortening or butter (I use half of each), and sugar together. (I like to use raw sugar.) Add vanilla extract.

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Sift all dry ingredients together, and add to butter mixture. Mix until dough forms, taking care not to over-beat. Chill the dough for 2 or more hours.

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

After dough is chilled, roll onto floured surface. The thinner your dough, the crispier your cookie will be. Cut cookies into desired shapes, using cookie cutters.
Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Brush with milk or half & half.

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Sprinkle with only sugar, or with sugar and cinnamon.

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bake for 8-11 minutes at 350. Watch the cookies, and remove before the edges begin to get too brown.

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Enjoy your cookies with family, neighbors, friends, and a cup of tea, coffee, or milk!

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Cook Time: 11 minutes

Yield: 4 to 5 dozen cookies

Old Fashioned Sand Tart Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 cup shortening or butter
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 3/4 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • Cinnamon & Sugar to sprinkle on top of cookies

Instructions

  1. Cream shortening (or butter) and sugar together.
  2. Add eggs and vanilla and beat until fluffy.
  3. Sift together flour, salt and baking soda.
  4. Add flour mixture to butter mixture.
  5. Mix just until medium-soft dough is formed. (Do not over-mix.)
  6. Chill for several hours in refrigerator.
  7. Preheat oven to 350.
  8. Roll on floured surface, until thin, and cut with desired cookie cutters.
  9. Brush tops with milk or half & half, and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon.
  10. Place 1 inch apart on a greased cookie sheet, bake for 8-11 minutes.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Samuel Martin; Mrs. Richard Danner; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press. ("The oldest recipe books call these cookies Saint Hearts.")

 

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes}

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

This is the Family Recipe day where two beautiful threads come together; my Amish-Mennonite heritage, and our family’s Ukrainian adoption story.

I’ll begin with the history of how Borscht would make its way into a cookbook found in my Amish grandmother’s home. It all began in the mid 1700’s, when Catherine the Great invited Europeans to “come settle various pieces of land in Russia”. Many Amish and Mennonite families responded to her offer, and moved their families to Russia and Ukraine. They lived in communities there, continuing to live out their faith, and speak their dialect of German. Both World War I and World War II brought devastation to the Anabaptist people, and thousands were granted refugee status, many moving to Canada, and some into the United States.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

As they came from the Soviet Union to North America from the early to mid 1900’s, they brought with them their Russian and Ukrainian recipes, which had become part of the “Russian Mennonite” culture.

These beloved recipes were selected to be part of the Mennonite Community Cookbook, which brings us to my family’s part of this Borscht story.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

If you’ve followed my blog, you know about our Ukrainian adoption. We first thought we would be adopting “Luba”. Although she was ultimately not the daughter we would bring home, she made an eternal imprint on our family’s heart. Her favorite food was Borscht, and I made it often during the time she spent with us!

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

The recipe I’m sharing today is a lighter version of Borscht, made with chicken broth. While we were in Ukraine we also enjoyed learning how to make Borscht with a beef or pork base, when the director of our daughter’s school there, prepared a delicious meal for us!

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

So, here it is; our family’s Borscht recipe. Enjoy!

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

My girls and I enjoy shopping for the beautiful ingredients. As with all vegetables, it’s a wonderful idea to find them at your local farmer’s market!

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Wash the beets thoroughly, and place them in a large pot with water. Cook until tender.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

While beets are cooking, dice potatoes and onions, grate carrots and slice cabbage.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

When beets are soft, remove them from the “beet broth”, (water), and add potatoes. Cook them over medium heat.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Grate beets, or slice into matchstick-sized pieces.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Sauté onions and carrots in skillet with olive oil. When soft, add cabbage. Cook until cabbage is hot.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add all vegetables to pot with potatoes and beet-water. Add tomato purée and chicken broth. Then season. Cook for 20-30 additional minutes.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

While borscht finishes cooking, you may prepare your parsley garnish. When we were in Ukraine our hostess added minced garlic and lemon to her parsley garnish. It was delicious, and we now do the same!

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

It’s time to enjoy your bowl of borscht! Top it with a dollop of sour cream, and sprinkle with dill and/or parsley.

Borscht {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 beets
  • 10 cups water
  • 6 potatoes
  • 3 carrots
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/2 head of green cabbage
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 16 ounces tomato purée
  • 4-6 cups chicken broth
  • Dill (optional)
  • 2 bay leaves (optional)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Wash beets thoroughly, place in large pot with water. Cook for 1 a 1 1/2 hours, or until beets are tender.
  2. While beets are cooking, prepare other vegetables. Dice potatoes and onions, grate carrots, and slice cabbage into thin slivers.
  3. When beets are tender, remove from pan.
  4. Keep "beet broth"! Add potatoes to the beet-water, and cook over medium heat.
  5. Pour olive oil into large skillet. Add onions and carrots. Sauté until tender.
  6. Add cabbage to skillet with onions and carrots, and cook over medium heat until cabbage is hot.
  7. Grate or slice beets into matchstick size.
  8. Add cabbage, carrots, onions and beets to pot with potatoes.
  9. Add tomato purée and chicken broth, and bay leaves.
  10. Season with dill, salt and pepper.
  11. Cook over low heat for 20-30 minutes.
  12. Garnish with sour cream.