Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

There’s nothing that can compare to the taste of fresh, garden tomatoes. My mother grew up on a working dairy farm in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. One of the crops her family raised was tomatoes. She has many recipes for delicious tomato dishes, that make my mouth water, just thinking about them! Fresh-from-the-garden-tomato sandwiches, served on thick slices of homemade bread, and creamy tomato soup were two of my favorites.

Another one of the unforgettable ways she prepared tomatoes was a simple dish called “Tomato Sauce”, from the Mennonite Community Cookbook. I compare it to an Italian Marinara sauce. The cookbook suggests serving this sauce over fish, but our family used it as a topping for savory French Toast.

I decided to put my own twist on this recipe, and serve it in a way I knew my family and friends would enjoy, by combining the fresh flavors of tomato sauce with creamy goat cheese, served over French baguette slices, for an appetizer. The result was successful, and one of my daughter’s new favorites! We were able to share it with friends at a baby shower this weekend, and we all enjoyed the cheesy-tomato goodness.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

To make this appetizer, you will begin by washing the tomatoes. Place in a large bowl, then crush by hand. Add one cup of water.
Strain off and remove one cup of liquid, leaving remaining liquid with crushed tomatoes.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

In saucepan, combine crushed tomatoes, tomato puree, chopped onion, torn basil and celery leaves, cloves, sugar, salt and pepper(s). Place over medium heat.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Heat olive oil in skillet, add flour and whisk together over medium heat. Add the cup of “tomato” liquid. Combine over heat until slightly thickened.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add this mixture to the saucepan with tomatoes. Stir.
Pour into shallow baking dish.
Slice goat cheese and place on top of tomato sauce.
Place under medium-high broiler for 10-12 minutes (or until slightly browned).
Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Serve warm, with sliced French baguette or Crostinis.

Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 5 cups tomato sauce, or 10 - 12 servings

1/2 cup

Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of fresh, heirloom, roma or small, sweet tomatoes, crushed by hand, plus 1 cup water
  • 16 ounces strained tomatoes, or tomato puree
  • 1/2 small onion, chopped (optional)
  • 8 cloves
  • 1 heaping Tablespoon sugar
  • 3/4 - 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup Celery leaves, torn (optional)
  • 1/8 cup Basil leaves, torn
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, plus a sprinkle of capsicum pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons flour
  • 8 ounces soft goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Wash tomatoes, then crush by hand. Add one cup of water.
  2. Strain off and remove one cup of liquid, leaving remaining liquid with crushed tomatoes.
  3. In saucepan, combine crushed tomatoes, tomato puree, onion, basil, celery leaves, cloves, sugar, salt and pepper(s). Place over medium heat.
  4. Heat olive oil in skillet, add flour and whisk together over heat. Add the cup of "tomato" liquid. Combine over heat until slightly thickened.
  5. Add this mixture to the saucepan with tomatoes. Stir.
  6. Pour into shallow baking dish.
  7. Slice goat cheese and place on top of tomato sauce.
  8. Place under medium-high broiler for 10-12 minutes (or until slightly browned).
  9. Serve with sliced French baguette or Crostinis.

Notes

Recipe adapted from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press "Tomato Sauce"

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting {Amish Family Recipes}

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

One of my favorite treats at “Grussmommy” (Grandmother) Dienner’s house was the chocolate cake she often made for dessert. This decadent cake my girl’s and I baked today is reminiscent of the rich, chocolaty goodness my grandma so often served her family.

The original chocolate cake recipe (from the Mennonite Community Cookbook) that I’m using today calls for strong coffee. I substitute espresso. The original frosting recipe is simply Caramel Frosting. I add a sprinkle of sea salt. Together, this updated cake and frosting make a perfect flavorful pair!

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

To get things started, sift together the dry ingredients.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Then add the shortening, mixing with whisk attachment until fine crumbs form.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Add coffee and buttermilk, mix on medium speed for about one minute. Then add the additional buttermilk and eggs, and mix until smooth.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Pour into greased cake pan(s), and bake.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

While cake is baking, it’s the perfect time to make the frosting!

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Combine all four ingredients in saucepan, and bring to boil. Heat until caramel sauce temperature rises to 238, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, and cool for 15 -20 minutes.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Place caramel sauce in mixing bowl and beat until creamy frosting forms.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Spread over warm cake, sprinkle with sea salt, and serve! *Note, this is a thin layer of frosting, a little heavier than a glaze. If you want a thicker layer of icing, simply double the frosting recipe.

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Chocolate Espresso Cake with Salted Caramel Frosting {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • Sift together: 1 3/4 cups cake flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup cocoa
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • Add: 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup cooled espresso
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • Add: Another 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • 2 eggs, unbeaten

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease 2, 8 inch round cake pans, or 1, 13x9 cake pan.
  2. Sift together dry ingredients.
  3. Add shortening and blend into dry mixture until fine crumbs form, using whisk attachment on mixer.
  4. Add espresso and 1/3 cup buttermilk.
  5. Beat until smooth.
  6. Add another 1/3 cup buttermilk, and eggs.
  7. Beat just enough to blend thoroughly.
  8. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes.
  9. To make Salted Caramel Frosting: Combine 3 cups brown sugar, 1 cup half and half, 2 Tablespoons butter, and 1 teaspoon vanilla.
  10. Heat together in saucepan until boiling.
  11. Continue to stir, and bring to 238 degrees.
  12. Remove from heat, and cool in pan for 15-20 minutes.
  13. Beat on high setting with whisk attachment, until creamy.
  14. Spread on cake while cake is still warm, and sprinkle with sea salt.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. James Clymer; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

 

Chicken Croquettes {Amish Family Recipes}

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Chicken Croquettes. My daughter calls them gourmet, grown-up chicken nuggets, which makes me smile. Considering their savory, tender inside, enclosed in a crispy, crumb coating, I’d say her description is perfect! Our family enjoys serving mashed potatoes or baked sweet potatoes and a fresh, green salad, alongside this tasty main dish.

“Croquettes, small shaped masses of some savory (or occasionally sweet) substance deep-fried, typically in a coating of breadcrumbs, get their name from their crisp exterior: for croquette is a derivative of the French verb croquer, crunch.”
—An A to Z of Food and Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002 (p. 98)

Although the croquette’s origins are French, it’s a frequently served dish in Amish and Mennonite households, and my grandmother’s homes were no exception.

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by chopping pre-cooked chicken into small pieces. (I use chicken breasts.)

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

To make the white sauce, melt the butter. Add flour and whisk together over medium-low heat. Add milk slowly, whisking constantly to keep the sauce smooth.

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

When the sauce thickens, turn off the heat and add seasonings.

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Mix white sauce with minced chicken. Beat eggs, and pour breadcrumbs into dish.

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

To form the croquettes, shape chicken mixture into meatball-sized portions. Dip each croquette into beaten eggs. then roll in breadcrumbs. (I use seasoned Panko crumbs.)

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

Heat skillet and coat the bottom with olive oil. Pan-fry the croquettes until lightly browned. Drain on napkin to remove any excess grease.

Chicken Croquettes | Amish Family Recipes | www.lydiaglick.com

And now your Chicken Croquettes are ready to serve! This recipe may be prepared in advance, or even frozen. If that is the case, pan-fry only until lightly browned, then chill. When serving, place in oven at 400 until heated through.

Chicken Croquettes {Amish Family Recipes}

Yield: 8 croquettes

2 croquettes

Chicken Croquettes {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups minced, cooked chicken
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 1/2 Tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion or garlic powder
  • 1 Tablespoon minced parsley
  • 1/8-1/4 teaspoon thyme (optional)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup dry bread crumbs
  • Olive Oil to coat bottom of skillet

Instructions

  1. Chop the pre-cooked chicken.
  2. Make a white sauce of the butter, flour and milk.
  3. Add salt, pepper and other seasonings to the white sauce. Cool.
  4. Combine chicken and seasoned sauce.
  5. Shape into eight croquettes. (About the size of large meatballs.)
  6. Dip in beaten eggs, then into crumbs.
  7. Pan-fry in olive oil at medium heat, for 3-5 minutes per side, or until brown.
  8. Set on napkins to remove excess oil before serving.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Simon P. Kraybill; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

References: An A to Z of Food and Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002 (p. 98), source, TheFoodTimeline.org

Cheesy-Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

I love potatoes. I love them in any shape, form or fashion. 🙂 I suppose I come by my appreciation of them honestly, as potatoes were a standby in both my Grandmother’s kitchens. They had no food processors or fancy kitchen, equipment. Instead, they used simple methods and tools to prepare whatever delicious potato dish they made.

Mashed potatoes are every Amish woman’s culinary specialty. My old-order Amish grandmother used a potato ricer and masher, to make her mashed potatoes, and my new-order Amish grandmother (who had electricity), used her kitchen mixer.

In addition to mashed potatoes, Scalloped Potatoes are a standby on the meat-and-potato driven menus in Amish and Mennonite homes. My mother made them often, served alongside Baked Ham, Salisbury Steaks or Meatloaf. Yummy! Scalloped potatoes take a little over an hour to bake, so you’ll need to take that into consideration when preparing your meal. But it’s worth every minute of your time in the kitchen!

I’ve taken the liberty of modifying the recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, by adding cheese and bacon. What’s not to love?!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

First, peel those potatoes. My mother always put them in water to keep them from browning, so I do the same.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Next, I fry the bacon in my favorite cast-iron skillet.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Now it’s time to gather all the ingredients, to prep for putting together your scalloped potato dish.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Slice the potatoes, using a knife, food processor or slicer.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Grease or butter your baking dish, and begin to assemble your ingredients. I like to make three layers, similar to putting together lasagna. Save the bacon and 1/3 of the cheese for the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

After everything but the bacon is in the pan, gently pour the hot milk over the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Top it all with your chopped bacon. Fifteen minutes before the dish has completed its cooking time, uncover it and sprinkle on the remaining cheese.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Enjoy!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 6 cups raw potatoes, sliced thin
  • 4 Tablespoons flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups hot milk
  • 2 Tablespoons cold butter
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley (optional)
  • 1 onion (optional)
  • 6 slices bacon (optional)
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated (optional)
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease casserole dish with butter, or olive oil spray.
  2. Prep work: Peel and slice potatoes; Fry and chop bacon; Chop onion; Grate cheese; Slice butter; Heat milk.
  3. Place 1/3 of the potatoes in a layer on bottom of casserole. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and flour, and dot with butter.
  4. Add 1/3 of each of the optional ingredients to the layer, except for bacon. (Onion, cheeses, and parsley.)
  5. Continue layering all three layers. Do not put cheese on top layer just yet. If using bacon, place it on top now.
  6. Cover and bake at 350 for one hour. Uncover, place remaining cheese on top, and place back in oven for 15 additional minutes.
  7. Let rest for 20 or more minutes after removing from the oven. Serve with fresh chopped parsley.

 

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes}

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

I learned to make this recipe in my mother’s wonderful kitchen. As are most of the Amish recipes I’m sharing in this series, it’s an uncomplicated, straightforward dish, filled with simple and hearty flavors, for the entire family to enjoy. Although only the most sensitive of pallets would taste the rice in this recipe, it adds a texture which when baked resembles porcupine quills, making it an especially fun recipe for children. It’s delicious served with a salad and potatoes! I’ve always been fascinated with the name, so I did a little research. I found this interesting information on TheFoodTimeLine.org:

“Porcupine meatballs. The sort of easy, novelty recipe that appealed to cooks in the 30s, yet it appears to have been developed during World War I as a way to stretch meat. In Conservation Recipes (1918) compiled by the Mobilized Women’s Organizations of Berkeley and published by the Berkeley Unit, Council of Defence Women’s Committee, there is something called “Rice Meat Balls,” a clear forerunner of the recipes.”
—American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes fo the 20th Century, Jean Anderson [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1997 (p. 104)

I once that Native American Indians made a meatball with venison and wild rice. In addition, one of the processes of this recipe (soaking the breadcrumbs in milk), is clearly a Swedish thing. So it seems that not only the Amish culture, but many others in America can lay claim to this yummy meatball.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

First, tear stale or toasted bread into small pieces. This is a great job to set little helping hands to! (I like to use Ezekiel Bread.) Pour the milk over the bread crumbs, stir, and allow to soften.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

 

Place ground meat in bowl, (the recipe calls for ground beef, I like to use local, grass-fed beef, or turkey burger). Add salt and seasonings, egg, 1/2 cup uncooked rice, and onion. (The onion is optional, I add it to half the meatballs.) Mix together gently, taking care not to over-beat.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

The Mennonite Community Cookbook calls only for salt as a seasoning. In addition, I add black pepper, just a hint of cayenne pepper, paprika, parsley and basil.  I’ve seen other recipes that call for garlic and Worcestershire sauce, both would be great additions, if desired!

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Not only do I add those seasonings to the porcupine meatball mixture, I add the same things to the waiting Tomato Juice which acts as a sauce. (If you don’t have tomato juice on hand, you can blend tomatoes, or use tomato sauce mixed with water, a 2 parts tomato sauce and 1 part water ratio.)

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

After forming the meatballs, place in a greased pan. Pour sauce over the meatballs.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.comPlace in oven, bake covered for 45 minutes, and uncovered for remainder of time. Your Porcupine meatballs are ready to be served!

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Yield: 8 meatballs

1 meatball

Ingredients

  • 1 pound hamburger (or turkey burger)
  • 4 slices bread
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 medium onion (chopped coarsely or fine, whichever your preference)
  • 1/4 cup uncooked rice (brown or white)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups tomato juice
  • *Optional seasonings: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper to meatballs and sauce, a dash of cayenne pepper to each, a dash of paprika to each, 1/2 teaspoon parsley to each, 1/2 teaspoon basil to each

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease baking dish.
  2. Crumble bread and soak in milk.
  3. Add beaten egg.
  4. Mix with other ingredients (except tomato juice).
  5. Add seasonings to meat mixture and to sauce. Mix/stir.
  6. Pour tomato juice over the meatballs.
  7. Bake covered for 45 minutes, and uncovered for 35-45 minutes, or until slightly browned.

Notes

Recipe source: Mabel Lehman; Mrs. Rueben Eberly; Mennonite Community Cookbook

References:

American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes fo the 20th Century, Jean Anderson [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1997 (p. 104)

TheFoodTimeline.org

Food for a Barn Raising {Amish Family Recipes}

Mennonite Community Cookbook | Amish Family Recipes | www.LydiaGlick.com

What exactly is the “Mennonite Community Cookbook“? There are two answers to that question.

First, the Mennonite Community Cookbook was the food bible of sorts in our home kitchen, where my talented mama taught me how to cook. It’s the first cookbook we referenced when looking for a traditional Amish recipe, and it was the standard for our family’s Pennsylvania Dutch cooking. My mother has a hardback edition, and she gave me the copy depicted in the photo when I set up my kitchen as a young married woman.

Grandma Lydia's Good Dishes

My Grandma Lydia’s “Good Dishes”, used for entertaining. {Photo Credit Kathryn Dienner

And next, this cookbook (initially published in 1950), was the first comprehensive gathering of Amish and Mennonite recipes. Its collection is “a compilation of over 1,100 recipes, chosen from more than 5000 recipes sent in from Mennonite communities in the United States and Canada”, a gathering and organizing of hundreds of hand-written, traditional recipes passed down through the generations. It’s truly a treasure.

Although I’m not Amish, I come from a beautiful heritage of Antibaptist, Amish and Mennonite ancestors. My blog is named after my two, Amish grandmothers, Lydia Esh, and Barbra Glick-Dienner. Last year during the #write31days challenge, I shared stories and lessons from my Amish family, that I wanted to be sure are not lost to my daughters. It was such a special experience that I decided to continue in the same vein this October. As this cookbook is an important part of the Amish-Mennonite culture, naturally I decided it was a great starting point for this month’s writing!

This is day 7 of the #write31days challenge, and I had scheduled “Cup Cheese” for today’s post. Unfortunately the cheese process didn’t get my memo ;-), and is taking longer than planned. So I thought I’d share a fun recipe of sorts from the “Miscellaneous” section of the Mennonite Community Cookbook.

Thank you for following along with my cooking and writing journey this month. I am thoroughly enjoying every post! So, with no further ado, here’s the recipe for today: Food for a Barn Raising, “enough food for 175 men”.

Mennonite Community Cookbook | Amish Family Recipes | www.LydiaGlick.com

Food for a Barn Raising {Amish Family Recipes}

Yield: Enough food for 175 men

Food for a Barn Raising {Amish Family Recipes}

(Photo of my Grandpa Esh's Amish barn, in Morgantown, Pa. Circa 1970

Ingredients

  • 115 lemon pies
  • 500 fat cakes (doughnuts)
  • 15 large cakes
  • 3 gallons applesauce
  • 3 gallons rice pudding
  • 3 gallons cornstarch pudding
  • 16 chickens
  • 3 hams
  • 50 pounds roast beef
  • 300 light rolls
  • 16 loaves bread
  • Red beet pickle and pickled eggs
  • Cucumber pickle
  • 6 pounds dired prunes, stewed
  • 1 large crock stewed raisins
  • 5 gallon stone jar white potatoes and the same amount of sweet potatoes

Instructions

  1. "This bit of information was found in a quaint, old handwritten recipe book from Great-grandmother's day...As many of us know, a "barn raising" was quite an event during those early years. When a new barn was built, all the fiends and neighbors came on the specified day to help put up the framework of the barn. This policy is still carried out in some communities where neighbors are neighborly. Homemakers of our day will no doubt be astounded at all the food consumed in one day. What is more difficult to believe is that it was all made in Great-grandmother's kitchen." ~ Mary Emma Showalter, author of the Mennonite Community Cookbook

Notes

Recipe source: Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Interesting link: Amish Barn Raising Time-lapse Video

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

One of the things I appreciate most about traditional Amish recipes is the simplicity of ingredients. Many of them can be made with things on hand in a well-stocked pantry, and require no trip to the grocery store. Another great fact is the cost-effectiveness for many of these recipes, such as previously shared Chicken Corn Soup, and Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings.

My Amish grandmothers made many varieties of delectable cookies, especially around the holidays. The recipe I’m sharing today is taken directly from the Mennonite Community Cookbook. These flour-free wafers are thin and crispy, with a slightly chewy center, making them a perfect pairing with tea or coffee!

The recipe can be made gluten free, simply by ensuring the oats you’re using are processed in a gluten-free location. (The packaging should inform you of this.) These cookies can also be dairy free, simply by substituting coconut oil for the butter.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

To make the Oatmeal Lace Wafers, begin by combining the butter and sugar. Beat with mixer. Add vanilla, then the eggs.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Beat these ingredients together till fluffy, making sure to scrape sides with spatula.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Combine oats with salt and baking powder. Stir well.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Add oat mixture to creamed mixture. Beat together until entirely combined.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Place small (not generous) teaspoonfuls onto greased baking sheet. (I like to use coconut oil spray.) Note from personal experience: If you make the cookies too large before baking, they will run together and you will have a hot mess on your hands, resembling one, giant cookie. 🙂 So be sure to control the cookie-dough size on your sheet!

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Bake for 10-12 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool for a couple of minutes before removing from the tray.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

And there you have it! A delightful little, crispy, cookie – ready to be enjoyed with family and friends.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 11 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 3 dozen cookies

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder

Instructions

  1. Cream together butter and sugar.
  2. Add vanilla.
  3. Add eggs and beat until fluffy
  4. Combine oats with salt and baking powder, then add to creamed mixture.
  5. Drop by (small, not generous) teaspoonfuls onto greased baking sheet, spaced about 2 to 3 inches apart.
  6. Bake at 375 for 12 minutes.
  7. Makes 3 dozen cookies.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. L. Strong; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Baked Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipe}

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Wholesome, flavorful and satisfying describe this Baked Stuffed Peppers recipe, based on the Mennonite Community Cookbook.

I’ve modified the recipe, adding some flavors our family enjoys. This dish is simple to put together, and even those who don’t care for peppers will enjoy the stuffing from inside!

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

The first step of this recipe is to cook your rice (I use brown Basmati, as it creates a nice texture and flavor in the stuffed peppers). All the other prep work can be done while the rice is cooking. Now it’s time to chop & prepare your vegetables.

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Remove the tops from your peppers, and take out seeds and membrane from the inside.

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Saute onions and garlic in a bit of olive oil, and brown the seasoned ground beef. Add diced tomatoes. Parboil the prepared peppers for 5 minutes, by placing them in boiling water, and removing promptly when the timer rings.

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Drain the peppers, and now they’re ready to stuff!

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Combine vegetables, ground beef, rice and parmesan cheese in pan. (*I kept some of the mixture to the side before adding parmesan cheese, so that I have a gluten and dairy-free serving for a family member.)

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Place peppers in a greased baking dish. Spoon your prepared mixture into the peppers. (The red pepper is our dairy-free and gluten-free pepper. 🙂 )

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Next top the peppers with Panko bread crumbs that have been toasted in butter, and combined with Parmesan cheese.

Place in the oven and bake for only 25 minutes. Top with sour cream, and ENJOY!

Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Baked Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipe}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

1 pepper

Baked Stuffed Peppers {Amish Family Recipe}

*This recipe is based on one from the Mennonite Community Cookbook

Ingredients

  • 8, medium sized bell peppers
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 3 cups prepared rice (1 cup rice, cooked in 2 cups water, using standard rice cooking instructions)
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 roma tomatoes, diced
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1/2-3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper and a dash of red pepper
  • 1 teaspoon (or more) basil
  • 1 teaspoon (or more) oregano
  • 2 Tablespoons browned butter
  • 3/4 cup Panko bread crumbs
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese ( 1/2 for meat and rice filling, and 1/2 cup for breadcrumb topping
  • Sour Cream for garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350, and grease a 9x13 baking dish.
  2. Cook and salt rice according to directions. While rice is cooking, prepare vegetables and stuffing:
  3. Fill large pot with water, place on stove and bring to boil.
  4. Cut tops off peppers, remove seeds and veins.
  5. Place peppers in boiling water for 5 minutes and then remove immediately. Drain off excess water.
  6. Mince onions and garlic, lightly saute in skillet, add ground beef and seasonings, (salt, black and red pepper, basil and oregano), and cook until beef is browned. Add cooked rice and parmesan cheese.
  7. Stuff peppers evenly.
  8. Melt butter in skillet, brown slightly and add bread crumbs. Toast lightly. Turn off heat and add parmesan cheese. Place this mixture on top of stuffed peppers, arranged in baking dish.
  9. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes, then turn to 400 and back for 5 additional minutes.
  10. Garnish with sour cream if desired.

Notes

For dairy-free, gluten-free version: Omit parmesan cheese in the filling, and refrain from topping with breadcrumb/cheese mixture. Be sure to prepare the rice with olive oil instead of butter.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

If you’re looking for a crumb coffee cake that’s not too sweet, and is delicious served in a bowl with milk or cream, this is it! It’s an easy alternative to sugary breakfast foods and is simple to make. It’s best when enjoyed hot, right out of the oven, and served with freshly brewed coffee.

The recipe in the Mennonite Community Cookbook  calls for regular flour, but in our home growing up with a health-conscious mama, we substituted fresh-ground, whole wheat flour. These days I like to use a combination of almond flour (or almond meal) and whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

The first step is sifting together the flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Cut in the shortening next. I use all natural coconut oil shortening alternative instead of typical shortening. After adding the shortening, reserve 1/2 cup of the crumb mixture and place to the side.

Add the baking powder and baking soda to the remaining crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Beat egg with a fork, add coffee and pour the liquid mixture into the flour crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Stir all ingredients together with a fork, do not over-mix. The mixture will be thick, unlike a standard cake batter. Pour into a greased pie plate, and even the batter gently by pressing down with your hands. Pour the nuts and reserved crumbs on top.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

The recipe directions call for baking the crumb cake at 400 for 30 minutes, but I find it needs a little less time (closer to 25 minutes) with almond flour/ whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Remove from the oven and serve warm! My favorite way to eat this crumb cake is in a bowl, covered with fresh milk or whipping cream.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup shortening
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup cold coffee
  • 1/3 cup chopped nuts

Instructions

  1. Sift all dry ingredients together, except soda and baking powder.
  2. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse corn meal.
  3. Reserve 1/2 cup of this mixture for topping.
  4. To remainder, add soda and baking powder and mix thoroughly with a fork.
  5. Beat egg, add coffee and combine with flour mixture.
  6. Pour into a 9 inch greased pie plate and sprinkle with the 1/2 cup of crumbs and chopped nuts.
  7. Bake at 400 for 30 minutes.
  8. "This is excellent when served with coffee for breakfast or lunch."

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Clayton Rohrer; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Modifications by Justina Dee: "I like to use a combination of whole wheat and almond flours, or sprouted grain flour in place of white flour. Also, I use coconut oil shortening, and I especially like pecans for the nuts."

 

 

 

 

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

As a little girl I watched my mama make my favorite apple dessert, Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings, using the recipe from her worn copy of the Mennonite Community Cookbook. The Granny Smith apples enclosed in a delicate, flaky crust, bathed in scrumptious, buttery, brown sugar sauce and topped off with cream, equals perfection. Naturally, I’ve chosen to share this favorite recipe of mine with my girls, and with you, here on 31 days of Amish Family Recipes!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Begin with a half-dozen green apples. This is the perfect opportunity to use some you’ve just picked from a local orchard! My favorite spot to pick apples, is the lovely Weaver’s Orchard, in Morgantown, PA, which is where my Grandpa’s farm is located.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

To begin making this delicious dessert, core and peel the apples, keeping them whole. I loved watching my mama perform this step when I was a little girl. She made it look effortless! Although the recipe doesn’t call for it, I immediately brush my cored apples with lemon juice, to prevent them from browning.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Next it’s time to make the pastry crust. I use all-natural coconut oil shortening and sea salt combined with non-bleached organic flour, non-aluminum baking powder and farm-fresh milk. Resist the urge to over-handle this dough, as it will be flakier if handling is kept to a minimum.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

I always enjoy rolling out this soft crust, cutting it into six pieces and placing the cored apples on top.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Now it’s time to fill the apple centers with brown sugar and sprinkle them with cinnamon. I use dark brown sugar, as it gives the Apple dumplings a rich flavor. I live just outside of Houston, TX, so I like to use Imperial Sugar, because it’s local – and, of course delicious!

Next, make the sauce, using brown sugar, cinnamon, water, butter.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Finally, wrap the dumplings by folding the edges toward the center and gently pressing the pastry together. Place in greased baking pan (I like to use my stoneware piece), and pour the brown sugar sauce over top. It’s time to bake the Apple dumplings!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

After baking at 375 for 35-40 minutes, the Apple dumplings are ready to eat. They’re delicious served fresh and warm, with cream, milk, or vanilla ice cream!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Yield: 6-10 servings

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 6 medium-sized apples
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • Sauce: 2 cups brown sugar (I use dark brown)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or nutmeg, optional (I use both)

Instructions

  1. Pare and core apples. Leave whole.
  2. To make pastry, sift flour, baking powder and salt together.
  3. Cut in shortening until particles are about the size of peas.
  4. Sprinkle milk over mixture and press together lightly, working dough only long enough to hold together.
  5. Roll dough as for pastry (or pie crust thickness) and cut into 6 squares and place an apple on each.
  6. Fill cavity in apple with sugar and cinnamon.
  7. Pat dough around Apple to cover it completely.
  8. Fasten edges securely on top of Apple.
  9. Place dumplings 1 inch apart in a greased baking pan.
  10. Pour over them the sauce made as follows:
  11. Combine brown sugar, water and spices.
  12. Cook for 5 minutes, remove from heat and add butter.
  13. Bake at 375 for 35-40 minutes.
  14. Baste occasionally during baking.
  15. Serve hot with rich milk or cream.

Notes

Source: Mrs. Forrest Ogburn; Mrs. U. Grant Weaver, Mrs. James Bauman; Mennonite Community Cookbook