Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Serving foods as they’re harvested in season is one of the things I love most about Amish and Mennonite cooking. Because so many of their ingredients were grown in their own gardens, my grandmothers cooked seasonally long before it was in style to do so. Acorn squash is a signature vegetable of Autumn, so I’m excited to share this Stuffed, Roasted Acorn Squash recipe with you today.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale and Goat Cheese

The recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook is very simple, so I decided to change it up a little, roasting the squash instead of simply baking it, and adding Kale, Onions, Red Peppers and Goat Cheese.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Begin by cutting the squash in half (in whichever direction you choose), and clean out the seeds.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Drizzle the squash with olive oil and honey, and sprinkle with sea salt, fresh ground pepper and a tiny bit of sage.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Place face up in roasting pan or on a cookie tray, and bake for 30-45 minutes, or until squash is tender.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

While squash is baking, brown sausage in skillet.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Slice kale, and dice onion and red peppers.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

When sausage is browned, remove from skillet and add vegetables. Cook for 7-10 minutes, or until tender.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Combine sausage and vegetables, taste and season with salt and pepper if desired, and add goat cheese. Stir together.

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese

Spoon sausage mixture into roasted acorn squash, sprinkle with goat cheese, and serve!

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Roasted Acorn Squash, Stuffed with Turkey Sausage, Kale & Goat Cheese {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 acorn squash
  • Approximately 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
  • Approximately 2 Tablespoons Honey
  • Dash of Sea Salt for each squash
  • Fresh ground pepper for each squash
  • Slight sprinkle of ground sage for each squash
  • Filling: 1 pound turkey sausage
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 bunch kale, sliced thin
  • 1 small red pepper, diced
  • 1 small sweet onion, diced
  • 5 ounces goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Cut squash in half, spoon out seeds.
  3. Place face up in roasting pan or cookie tray.
  4. Drizzle with olive oil and honey.
  5. Sprinkle with sea salt, fresh ground pepper, and a bit of ground sage.
  6. Place in oven. (Uncovered.)
  7. Brown sausage in skillet coated with olive oil or butter.
  8. Slice/chop/dice; kale, red peppers, onions and garlic.
  9. When sausage is browned, remove from skillet, drizzle skillet with olive oil or 1/2 TBS of butter, and place vegetables in skillet. Sauté till tender - about 10 minutes.
  10. Add meat, and crumble in half of the the goat cheese. Stir until combined.
  11. Remove squash from oven when tender. (Should be easily pierced with fork.)
  12. Spoon sausage filling into squash.
  13. Crumble remaining goat cheese on top. Place under broiler for a few minutes of desired (not necessary), and serve.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Meet “Fried Cornmeal Mush”, a crispy and delicious breakfast food that forms a perfect union of my little family’s American, Italian, Texan and Amish roots.

I have sweet memories of my Grussmommy Barbara Glick-Dienner (who lived in Lancaster County, PA), cutting slices of the cornmeal mush she had prepared the day before, and chilled overnight. She fried them to perfection in her well-seasoned, cast iron skillet, and served the fried cornmeal mush to her family for breakfast. We topped it with Maple Syrup, and enjoyed every bite of the buttery-crisp on the outside, while tasty-soft on the inside, hearty breakfast food.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

My mother made this food for my siblings and me, growing up in East Texas. We loved it! Although I always viewed it as an “Amish” food, I learned that Cornmeal Mush was not only an Early American, and Amish standby – it was equally as popular in Southern cooking. There are recipes for Cornmeal Mush from New England, Austin, Texas and a Jewish Cookbook from New York, all dating back to one-hundred years ago or more. The recipe I’m sharing today is actually adapted from the Laura Ingalls Wilder-inspired “Little House Cookbook”, as Cornmeal Mush was also commonly served in Pioneer homes.

“One of the early foods enjoyed by early colonists and settlers to America was corn meal mush. The newcomers learned to make and eat this from the native American Indians. Indians had been grinding corn for centuries making all kinds of dishes.

Hot cereal was known for years in other parts of the world. It went under various names, as porridge, hasty pudding and lobiolly. Thus, during the decades of European settlement of America, mush made from cornmeal became the usual breakfast and supper dish.” – America Civil War History Forums 

As I’m married to a wonderful Italian man who also has a rich family food-culture history, I adore Italy’s version of Cornmeal Mush; Polenta. In our house today, my girls love both versions. I enjoyed reading this fascinating article by the New York Times, on the commonalities of America’s Cornmeal Mush, and Italy’s Polenta, where they call Polenta the “Cornmeal Mush with a Little Italian Accent”. We typically prepare our fried version of Polenta in olive oil, while we use butter for fried Cornmeal Mush.

Although Mennonite Community Cookbook’s version of this recipe calls for flour, I used the traditional method from “The Little House Cookbook”, and another cookbook I love called “Wholesome Home Cooking“. They both call for the traditional 4 cups of water to 1 cup of stoneground cornmeal ratio that my mother uses in her kitchen.

So much to say, about a humble little dish! Here’s the recipe-lowdown.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Begin preparations one day in advance, by preparing your Cornmeal Mush. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil, and add salt. In a separate dish, combine additional 1 cup of water with cornmeal, and whisk together until smooth. Slowly add the corn mixture to the water, whisking briskly to keep it smooth.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Simmer over low heat for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Spread into a small, shallow dish or loaf pan. Cover and allow to cool in refrigerator for several hours or overnight.
Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

When cool, remove from pan and slice about 3/8 inches thick.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Your cornmeal-mush is ready to pan-fry!

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Coat bottom of cast iron skillet with butter, lard or olive oil.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Fry on both sides until golden brown, and slightly crisp on the outside.

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes}

Serve with butter and syrup, with ketchup, or plain. Yum, yum, yum!

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Yield: 4-6 servings

Pan-fried Cornmeal Mush {Amish Family Recipes)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cornmeal (preferably organic and stoneground)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 4 cups water

Instructions

  1. Bring 3 cups of the water to a boil in a (3 quart or larger) kettle.
  2. Stir in the salt.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of water and the cornmeal, till smooth.
  4. Reduce heat, and slowly add the cornmeal mixture to the hot water, whisking briskly to avoid lumps.
  5. Increase burner heat and bring back to a boil, stirring constantly.
  6. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Stirring several times. The cornmeal mush consistency will resemble that of cooked oatmeal.
  7. To make the Fried Cornmeal Mush, place the mixture in a loaf pan or shallow baking dish.
  8. Allow to cool for several hours or overnight.
  9. Slice approximately 3/8 inch thick.
  10. Coat bottom of a cast iron skillet with butter, lard, or olive oil, and fry on both sides until golden-brown.

Notes

Recipe sources: Wholesome Home Cooking, Katie Stoltzfus & Whitmore Printing; The Little House Cookbook, Barbara Walker & Harper Collins Publishers; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

References:

The Food Timeline

The New York Times, on Cornmeal Mush and Polenta

Wholesome Home Cooking

The Little House Cookbook

 

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Although it’s not what most Americans would call “Pot Pie”, this traditional Pennsylvania Dutch Chicken stew with homemade noodles, is the first thing that comes to mind when talking about Pot Pie, with anyone from the Amish culture.

“Chicken Pot Pie” is the ultimate, hearty, comfort food, with its savory, made-from-scratch chicken broth base, loaded with chunks of tender chicken, potatoes, and thick, dumpling-like, square noodles. It is often served at local fundraisers in Amish-influenced communities, and is always a crowd pleaser.

The first mention of “Noodles” was in German cookbooks from the 1400’s, and as Amish-Mennonite cooking is steeped with German traditions, the noodles in this pot pie are the quintessential mark of its German origins.

I have fond memories of helping my Mama de-bone the cooked chicken, roll out the stiff dough, and cut it into beautiful diamonds. While teaching my girls how to make it, their favorite part of the process was making the noodles.

Some recipes call for the addition of carrots, onions and celery, and other herbs and spices. Although they are all delicious additions, I followed the traditional Mennonite Community Cookbook’s ingredient list, and kept our Chicken Pot Pie very simple while teaching my girls how to make it.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by placing a whole chicken in a large pot, and cover it with water. Cook for about 1 1/2 hours, or until chicken begins falling off the bones. Cool, and remove from broth. De-bone chicken and cut into large chunks. Strain broth and place back into pot. Add chicken and salt. Bring to simmer over low heat.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

To make noodles, place flour and eggs into mixer bowl.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Mix, using dough hook attachment.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add cream, one tablespoon at a time, until dough forms.
Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Shape into circle, and place on floured surface, ready to roll. You can see my daughter had fun with this step. 🙂

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Peel and slice potatoes.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add potatoes to chicken broth. Cover so they can soften while you finish the noodles.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Roll out dough until very thin – about 1/8 of an inch.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Cut into one-inch or larger pieces. My mother always formed diamond-shaped noodles, which I think are beautiful.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bring simmering broth mixture to a low boil. Slowly add noodles, one at a time so as to avoid them sticking together. Cook over medium heat, for 20 minutes.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Chop fresh parsley…

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

…add to pot pie.

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

…and serve to your family and friends!

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours

Yield: 8 servings

Chicken Pot Pie Stew {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • One 4-6 pound chicken
  • Water - enough to cover chicken in cooking pot
  • 1-2 teaspoons sea salt, based on personal preference
  • Fresh-craked black pepper to taste
  • 5 medium potatoes, sliced
  • 2-3 Tablespoons fresh, chopped parsley
  • Potpie dough: 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4-6 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream

Instructions

  1. Place whole chicken in a large pot, and cover it with water.
  2. Cook for about 1 1/2 hours, or until chicken begins falling off the bones.
  3. Cool, and remove from broth.
  4. Debone chicken and cut into large chunks.
  5. Strain broth and place back into pot.
  6. Add chopped chicken, salt, and pepper.
  7. Bring to simmer over low heat.
  8. To make noodles, place flour, salt and eggs into mixer bowl.
  9. Mix for about one minute, using dough hook attachment.
  10. Turn mixer on low speed, and add heavy cream, 1 tablespoon at a time until ball of dough forms.
  11. Shape dough into circle, and place on floured surface.
  12. *(At this time, Peel and slice potatoes. Add potatoes to simmering broth and allow them to cook for 20 minutes while finishing up the noodles.)
  13. Roll very thin (about 1/8 inch thickness), and slice into 1-inch or larger diamonds or squares.
  14. Bring simmering broth mixture to low boil, slowly add noodles, one at a time so as to avoid them sticking together.
  15. Cook for 20 minutes, over medium heat.
  16. Chop parsley, add to Pot Pie, and serve.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Harvey Stover, Mrs. J.C. Clemens, Mrs. Amos Kreider; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Interesting link and source:

Bon Appetit’s “The Origin of the Word Noodle

The Washington Post, on Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine (including Chicken Pot Pie)

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Shepherd’s Pie is an ultimate comfort food with its flavorful and hearty meat base, and mounds of creamy, mashed potatoes on top, baked till just browned and delicious.

Although its origins are not Amish, I can see why the Amish community adopted the recipe, and placed it in the Mennonite Community Cookbook. The ingredients and flavors are simple and delicious, and it uses ingredients commonly found in their kitchens.

Meat and potato pies date back to medieval times, with roots in Great Britain. Shepherd’s Pie is a relative of its earlier cousin; Cottage Pie. Shepherd’s Pie was typically made with lamb or mutton, while Cottage Pie used beef.

“But in fact, cottage pie is a much older term than shepherd’s pie, which does not crop up until the 1870s. On 29 August 1791 we find that enthusiastic recorder of all his meals, the Reverend James Woodford, noting in his diary Dinner to day, Cottage-Pye and rost Beef’ (it is not clear precisely what he meant by cottage pie, however).”
—An A to Z of Food and Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002 (p. 92)

The earliest online reference I could find of Shepherd’s Pie in an American cookbook, was in “Philadelphia Mrs. Rorer’s Philadelphia Cook Book,” published in 1886. (www.FoodTimeline.org.)

The recipe listed in the Mennonite Community Cookbook is very simple, using the old-fashioned Shepherd’s Pie method of lining the bottom of the baking dish with potatoes, as well placing them on top. It doesn’t list amounts, rather calls for leftover meat, and a few additions. Today I’m sharing a recipe I’ve compiled from several – one that my entire family (with varying palates), enjoys very much! It can easily be modified and be made dairy and gluten-free. Although true Shepherd’s Pie often calls for cubed or chunks of meat, I love to use pasture-fed, organic ground beef from local farmers, because of the simplicity in cooking it. Happy eating!

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Gather potatoes, carrots, and an onion.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Peel and quarter all potatoes but three potatoes, and place in water. Salt them and cook, for the mashed potato topping on your Shepherd’s Pie. Peel the remaining three potatoes and cut into one inch squares. These will be used in the stew portion of your dish.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Chop onions and slice carrots.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Sprinkle with salt, and saute’ in with olive oil for three minutes. Remove from skillet.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Brown ground beef in same skillet.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Place browned ground beef, sautéed vegetables, diced potatoes, broth, tomato purée and seasonings in large pot. Bring to a simmer.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

While the stew is simmering, mash the potatoes.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

After Mashed Potatoes are ready, whisk together flour and water till smooth. Add to simmering stew.

Shepherd's Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Stir well and allow to thicken for several minutes. Place stew in buttered casserole dish, and top with mashed potatoes. Bake for 30 minutes, at 350.

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Yield: 8 servings

Shepherd’s Pie {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3-5 carrots, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Salt, & Pepper to taste
  • 12 Russet potatoes (9 quartered and boiled for mashed potatoes, and 3 diced for stew base)
  • 32 ounces chicken broth
  • 15 ounces tomato puree
  • 1/8 teaspoon Thyme
  • 1/2 cup sweet, red cooking wine (optional)
  • For Mashed Potatoes: 1/2 cup butter, and 1/2 cup or more of milk, cream or half and half

Instructions

  1. Peel and quarter all but three potatoes. Add 1 teaspoon salt and bring to boil. Cook on medium-low heat for 20 minutes, or until soft.
  2. Chop remaining three potatoes into one inch cubes.
  3. Chop onion and garlic, slice carrots.
  4. Heat olive oil in skillet, sprinkle with salt and saute vegetables for three minutes. Remove from skillet.
  5. Add one more tablespoon olive oil to pan. Brown meat in same skillet. Add 1 teaspoon salt.
  6. In large pot; place meat, vegetables, the three diced potatoes, chicken broth, tomato puree, thyme and optional red cooking wine. Bring to simmer. Cook for 30 minutes. Add more salt and fresh, cracked pepper if needed.
  7. Drain cooked potatoes. Beat till mashed. Add butter and mix well. Add cream and beat till smooth. Use reserved water from cooking potatoes if more liquid is needed.
  8. *If desired, whisk together 3/4 cup cold water and 1/3 cup all purpose flour till smooth, and add to stew mixture. Allow to simmer for a few minutes, to thicken.
  9. Butter bottom and sides of baking dish. Pour stew in bottom. Gently place mashed potatoes on top, spreading out to cover the meat.
  10. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes, or until slightly browned on top.

Interesting Links:

Jamie Oliver’s 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Shepherd’s Pie

Cook’s Info on Shepherd’s Pie

The Unexpected Origin of Shepherd’s Pie

References:

www.FoodTimeline.org

 

 

Butterscotch Squares, aka Naughty Bars {Amish Family Recipes}

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.comI’d like to introduce you to the simplest, most delicious bar cookie your taste buds will ever encounter,. Some people call them “Blondies”, or even better, “Naughty Bars”. If you look at recipes from the early 1900’s (or an Amish kitchen), their title was “Butterscotch Bars.” No matter what you call them, they are a sweet, delectable, golden, butter and sugary goodness, and I haven’t met a person who doesn’t love them. (Or who can eat just one.)

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

My dear friend Shannon (one of the most generous, hospitable and best home-chefs I know), made Penzey’s “Naughty Bars” for our family. We fell in love with them instantly. As I was going through the Mennonite Community Cookbook gathering from its pages some of our family’s favorite recipes, I saw the “Butterscotch Bars” recipe and realized it was exactly the same one Shannon had given me, except for one important measurement; the BUTTER. “Naughty Bars” call for exactly twice as much. 🙂

Whether you call them Butterscotch Bars, Blondies, or Naughty Bars, you’ll enjoy every bite. So, with no further ado, here’s the recipe Shannon shared with me:

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Begin by beating together melted butter and brown sugar. Add baking powder, salt and vanilla, and mix well.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Slowly add the flour, mixing between each addition.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Whisk eggs, pour into mixture and mix well.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Spread into 9×13 pan, using a spatula.

Butterscotch Bars {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Bake for 20-25 minutes. (Do not over-bake!) May be sliced while warm.

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Butterscotch Squares {Amish Family Recipes}

Source: Penzey's Spices and the Mennonite Community Cookbook.

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks butter (1 cup)
  • 2 cups packed brown sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350, grease 9x13 pan.
  2. Combine melted butter and brown sugar.
  3. Add the baking powder, salt and vanilla, and mix well.
  4. Slowly add flour, mix well between each addition.
  5. Whisk eggs in separate bowl, then add to mixture and combine well.
  6. Spread into greased pan, using spatula.
  7. Bake at 350, for 20 - 30 minutes, or until edges are golden. Center will still be soft to touch.
  8. Serve alone, or with ice cream.

Cheesy-Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

I love potatoes. I love them in any shape, form or fashion. 🙂 I suppose I come by my appreciation of them honestly, as potatoes were a standby in both my Grandmother’s kitchens. They had no food processors or fancy kitchen, equipment. Instead, they used simple methods and tools to prepare whatever delicious potato dish they made.

Mashed potatoes are every Amish woman’s culinary specialty. My old-order Amish grandmother used a potato ricer and masher, to make her mashed potatoes, and my new-order Amish grandmother (who had electricity), used her kitchen mixer.

In addition to mashed potatoes, Scalloped Potatoes are a standby on the meat-and-potato driven menus in Amish and Mennonite homes. My mother made them often, served alongside Baked Ham, Salisbury Steaks or Meatloaf. Yummy! Scalloped potatoes take a little over an hour to bake, so you’ll need to take that into consideration when preparing your meal. But it’s worth every minute of your time in the kitchen!

I’ve taken the liberty of modifying the recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, by adding cheese and bacon. What’s not to love?!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

First, peel those potatoes. My mother always put them in water to keep them from browning, so I do the same.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Next, I fry the bacon in my favorite cast-iron skillet.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Now it’s time to gather all the ingredients, to prep for putting together your scalloped potato dish.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Slice the potatoes, using a knife, food processor or slicer.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Grease or butter your baking dish, and begin to assemble your ingredients. I like to make three layers, similar to putting together lasagna. Save the bacon and 1/3 of the cheese for the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

After everything but the bacon is in the pan, gently pour the hot milk over the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Top it all with your chopped bacon. Fifteen minutes before the dish has completed its cooking time, uncover it and sprinkle on the remaining cheese.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Enjoy!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 6 cups raw potatoes, sliced thin
  • 4 Tablespoons flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups hot milk
  • 2 Tablespoons cold butter
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley (optional)
  • 1 onion (optional)
  • 6 slices bacon (optional)
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated (optional)
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease casserole dish with butter, or olive oil spray.
  2. Prep work: Peel and slice potatoes; Fry and chop bacon; Chop onion; Grate cheese; Slice butter; Heat milk.
  3. Place 1/3 of the potatoes in a layer on bottom of casserole. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and flour, and dot with butter.
  4. Add 1/3 of each of the optional ingredients to the layer, except for bacon. (Onion, cheeses, and parsley.)
  5. Continue layering all three layers. Do not put cheese on top layer just yet. If using bacon, place it on top now.
  6. Cover and bake at 350 for one hour. Uncover, place remaining cheese on top, and place back in oven for 15 additional minutes.
  7. Let rest for 20 or more minutes after removing from the oven. Serve with fresh chopped parsley.

 

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

If you’re looking for a crumb coffee cake that’s not too sweet, and is delicious served in a bowl with milk or cream, this is it! It’s an easy alternative to sugary breakfast foods and is simple to make. It’s best when enjoyed hot, right out of the oven, and served with freshly brewed coffee.

The recipe in the Mennonite Community Cookbook  calls for regular flour, but in our home growing up with a health-conscious mama, we substituted fresh-ground, whole wheat flour. These days I like to use a combination of almond flour (or almond meal) and whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

The first step is sifting together the flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Cut in the shortening next. I use all natural coconut oil shortening alternative instead of typical shortening. After adding the shortening, reserve 1/2 cup of the crumb mixture and place to the side.

Add the baking powder and baking soda to the remaining crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Beat egg with a fork, add coffee and pour the liquid mixture into the flour crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Stir all ingredients together with a fork, do not over-mix. The mixture will be thick, unlike a standard cake batter. Pour into a greased pie plate, and even the batter gently by pressing down with your hands. Pour the nuts and reserved crumbs on top.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

The recipe directions call for baking the crumb cake at 400 for 30 minutes, but I find it needs a little less time (closer to 25 minutes) with almond flour/ whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Remove from the oven and serve warm! My favorite way to eat this crumb cake is in a bowl, covered with fresh milk or whipping cream.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup shortening
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup cold coffee
  • 1/3 cup chopped nuts

Instructions

  1. Sift all dry ingredients together, except soda and baking powder.
  2. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse corn meal.
  3. Reserve 1/2 cup of this mixture for topping.
  4. To remainder, add soda and baking powder and mix thoroughly with a fork.
  5. Beat egg, add coffee and combine with flour mixture.
  6. Pour into a 9 inch greased pie plate and sprinkle with the 1/2 cup of crumbs and chopped nuts.
  7. Bake at 400 for 30 minutes.
  8. "This is excellent when served with coffee for breakfast or lunch."

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Clayton Rohrer; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Modifications by Justina Dee: "I like to use a combination of whole wheat and almond flours, or sprouted grain flour in place of white flour. Also, I use coconut oil shortening, and I especially like pecans for the nuts."

 

 

 

 

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

As a little girl I watched my mama make my favorite apple dessert, Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings, using the recipe from her worn copy of the Mennonite Community Cookbook. The Granny Smith apples enclosed in a delicate, flaky crust, bathed in scrumptious, buttery, brown sugar sauce and topped off with cream, equals perfection. Naturally, I’ve chosen to share this favorite recipe of mine with my girls, and with you, here on 31 days of Amish Family Recipes!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Begin with a half-dozen green apples. This is the perfect opportunity to use some you’ve just picked from a local orchard! My favorite spot to pick apples, is the lovely Weaver’s Orchard, in Morgantown, PA, which is where my Grandpa’s farm is located.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

To begin making this delicious dessert, core and peel the apples, keeping them whole. I loved watching my mama perform this step when I was a little girl. She made it look effortless! Although the recipe doesn’t call for it, I immediately brush my cored apples with lemon juice, to prevent them from browning.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Next it’s time to make the pastry crust. I use all-natural coconut oil shortening and sea salt combined with non-bleached organic flour, non-aluminum baking powder and farm-fresh milk. Resist the urge to over-handle this dough, as it will be flakier if handling is kept to a minimum.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

I always enjoy rolling out this soft crust, cutting it into six pieces and placing the cored apples on top.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Now it’s time to fill the apple centers with brown sugar and sprinkle them with cinnamon. I use dark brown sugar, as it gives the Apple dumplings a rich flavor. I live just outside of Houston, TX, so I like to use Imperial Sugar, because it’s local – and, of course delicious!

Next, make the sauce, using brown sugar, cinnamon, water, butter.

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

Finally, wrap the dumplings by folding the edges toward the center and gently pressing the pastry together. Place in greased baking pan (I like to use my stoneware piece), and pour the brown sugar sauce over top. It’s time to bake the Apple dumplings!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings | LydiaGlick.com

After baking at 375 for 35-40 minutes, the Apple dumplings are ready to eat. They’re delicious served fresh and warm, with cream, milk, or vanilla ice cream!

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Yield: 6-10 servings

Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 6 medium-sized apples
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • Sauce: 2 cups brown sugar (I use dark brown)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or nutmeg, optional (I use both)

Instructions

  1. Pare and core apples. Leave whole.
  2. To make pastry, sift flour, baking powder and salt together.
  3. Cut in shortening until particles are about the size of peas.
  4. Sprinkle milk over mixture and press together lightly, working dough only long enough to hold together.
  5. Roll dough as for pastry (or pie crust thickness) and cut into 6 squares and place an apple on each.
  6. Fill cavity in apple with sugar and cinnamon.
  7. Pat dough around Apple to cover it completely.
  8. Fasten edges securely on top of Apple.
  9. Place dumplings 1 inch apart in a greased baking pan.
  10. Pour over them the sauce made as follows:
  11. Combine brown sugar, water and spices.
  12. Cook for 5 minutes, remove from heat and add butter.
  13. Bake at 375 for 35-40 minutes.
  14. Baste occasionally during baking.
  15. Serve hot with rich milk or cream.

Notes

Source: Mrs. Forrest Ogburn; Mrs. U. Grant Weaver, Mrs. James Bauman; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Some of my favorite foodie-memories are of the specialty canned goods and preserves my grandmothers and mother made. There’s one item that is particularly “Amish”, as I’ve never seen it anywhere but in the Amish-Mennonite community; and that is Chow Chow. What in the world is “Chow Chow”? It’s a relish of sorts, made with a variety of vegetables, vinegar, sugar and seasonings. The flavors are traditionally sweet and sour, but some cooks like to make a spicy variety! It is usually served as a side dish with traditional Amish meals, and brings a sweet and tangy flavor to the menu. There are many wonderful recipes to be found including raw and fermented, but today I am sharing one from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, first published in 1950.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Begin the process by washing and chopping your vegetables to the desired size.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Amish cooks use ingredients fresh from their garden. As with all traditional and simple recipes, the taste will always be best when using the freshest produce possible.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

My grandmother used not only green beans in her Chow Chow, but Lima beans, yellow wax beans and kidney beans as well. Yum, yum! As a small child, I helped her chop and mix the vegetables in her large, antique crock.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

After chopping the vegetables, cook them briefly. I combine the vegetables that require a longer time to cook in one pot, (such as lima beans, cauliflower and green beans) and the ones that cook quickly (onions, peppers and cucumbers) in another. All the vegetables should retain their crunchy texture, and only be cooked for a few minutes. Although the recipe does not call for it, I add a small amount of sea salt to the water while cooking them.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

While your vegetables are heating, combine the vinegar and seasonings, and cook together until the mixture comes to a boil. (I like to use apple cider vinegar and raw sugar.)

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Combine all the vegetables and mix together gently. Pack into jars, then distribute the boiling liquid you’ve prepared evenly into each one. Be sure to clean the tops of your jars so they can seal properly.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Place prepared lids on jars, and lower into your canner. Bring water to a boil.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

My dear great-aunt Anna has a cookbook called “The Esh Family Cookbook”. I follow her canning directions Chow Chow, and cold pack my chow chow for 5 minutes after the water starts to boil.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

(This photo shows Chow Chow in one of my Grandma Esh’s delightful serving bowls.)

Place the jars on a shelf where everyone can enjoy their simple beauty as a work of kitchen-art, and enjoy this German sweet and sour delight! My grandmother always served her Chow Chow in beautiful dishes, no matter the occasion.

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Yield: 4 Quarts

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 quart cucumbers, diced
  • 1 quart string beans
  • 1 quart Lima beans
  • 1 quart corn
  • 1 pint celery
  • 1 pint green peppers
  • 1 pint red peppers
  • 1 cup small onions
  • 1 Tablespoon dry mustard
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 quart vinegar

Instructions

  1. Chop vegetables the desired size and cook separately.
  2. Cook until tender, not soft.
  3. Drain cooked vegetables and mix together.
  4. Combine sugar, mustard and vinegar.
  5. Bring to a boil.
  6. Add mixed vegetables to hot liquid and bring to a boiling point.
  7. Put into hot jars and seal.

Notes

Recipe source; Mrs. Olive Bergey, Souderton, PA. ; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Chicken and Corn Soup with Rivels {Amish Family Recipe}

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Few things say “comfort” in this autumn season, as beautifully as a bowl of homemade soup. I’ve decided to begin these 31 days of Amish Family recipes with this simple, delicious Chicken and Corn Soup recipe, from The Mennonite Community Cookbook. Its light broth is the perfect base for the juicy chicken, fresh corn, sweet onions, tender celery and of course; “rivels”, or dumplings, that together make up a bowl-full of yumminess our entire family loves.

The recipe is straightforward, and requires no seasonings other than salt and pepper. The savor comes instead from fresh ingredients, which this recipe allows to shine! For optimal taste, it’s important to buy your chicken and vegetables from a local source, where they’ve just recently been gathered and harvested.

The familiar flavors of this soup instantly take me back to fond memories of times when we gathered around my grandmother’s table in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. My mother also made amazing Chicken and Corn Soup, with fresh sweet corn from the garden, and tasty, home-raised chickens. I know your family and friends will enjoy eating this soup together too!

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

To begin, simply rinse a whole chicken, place in large pot, and cover with cool water.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

After the chicken is cooked, remove it from the pan, strain the broth, and place broth back in pan.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Add corn, bring to a gentle boil, then reduce to a simmer.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Chop chicken, celery and onion into desired sizes. Although some cooks like to dice the vegetables into fine pieces, I like to keep them larger so those who don’t care for celery or onion can easily pick it out and give it to someone else at the table who loves them! (Namely, me. 😉 )

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Add celery and onion to pot, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook at a gentle simmer while you prepare your rivels.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Combine milk, flour and egg in bowl, to make your rivels. (AKA, dumplings.)

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Cut with two forks, a pastry cutter, or your hands until small pieces form together.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Bring soup back to a gentle boil. Slowly add rivels, stirring gently. (If you don’t have time to make rivels, simply use noodles – or opt for a gluten-free version and forego the rivels and pasta altogether!) Finally, add the chopped chicken. Cook for 5-10 minutes, continuing to stir occasionally. And there you have it! Your delectable soup is ready to serve.

Chicken and Corn Soup #amishfamilyrecipes #lydiaglick

Chicken and Corn Soup with Rivels

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Yield: Serves 10

Chicken and Corn Soup with Rivels

Ingredients

  • Soup: 1, 4-5 pound chicken
  • 4 quarts cold water
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery and leaves
  • 2 1/2 cups fresh or frozen corn
  • 2 hard boiled eggs (optional)
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Rivels (Dumplings) 1 cup flour *note; I use 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt *note; original recipe does not call for salt in the rivels

Instructions

  1. Soup: Cook chicken 1 - 1 1/2 hours, or until it is tender, adding salt 30 minutes before it is done.
  2. Remove chicken and strain broth through a fine sieve.
  3. Take meat from bones and cut in bite sized pieces. Set aside.
  4. Add corn to broth and bring to boil. Add chopped onions, celery and season to taste with salt and pepper. Reduce to simmer.
  5. (While soup simmers for 10-15 minutes, assemble rivels. | Rivels: Combine flour, egg, milk and 1/4 teaspoon salt in bowl. Rub this mixture together with forks until the size of peas, and drop into boiling soup.
  6. 5-10 minutes before serving, add rivels, then add chicken and optional chopped boiled eggs. Cover and cook gently for 5 minutes. Serves 10. "This is delicious!"

Notes

Recipe Source: Mrs. B. L. Bucher, Dallastown, PA; Ruth Slaymaker, Leola, PA. - The Mennonite Community Cookbook