Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

There’s nothing that can compare to the taste of fresh, garden tomatoes. My mother grew up on a working dairy farm in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. One of the crops her family raised was tomatoes. She has many recipes for delicious tomato dishes, that make my mouth water, just thinking about them! Fresh-from-the-garden-tomato sandwiches, served on thick slices of homemade bread, and creamy tomato soup were two of my favorites.

Another one of the unforgettable ways she prepared tomatoes was a simple dish called “Tomato Sauce”, from the Mennonite Community Cookbook. I compare it to an Italian Marinara sauce. The cookbook suggests serving this sauce over fish, but our family used it as a topping for savory French Toast.

I decided to put my own twist on this recipe, and serve it in a way I knew my family and friends would enjoy, by combining the fresh flavors of tomato sauce with creamy goat cheese, served over French baguette slices, for an appetizer. The result was successful, and one of my daughter’s new favorites! We were able to share it with friends at a baby shower this weekend, and we all enjoyed the cheesy-tomato goodness.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

To make this appetizer, you will begin by washing the tomatoes. Place in a large bowl, then crush by hand. Add one cup of water.
Strain off and remove one cup of liquid, leaving remaining liquid with crushed tomatoes.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

In saucepan, combine crushed tomatoes, tomato puree, chopped onion, torn basil and celery leaves, cloves, sugar, salt and pepper(s). Place over medium heat.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Heat olive oil in skillet, add flour and whisk together over medium heat. Add the cup of “tomato” liquid. Combine over heat until slightly thickened.

Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Add this mixture to the saucepan with tomatoes. Stir.
Pour into shallow baking dish.
Slice goat cheese and place on top of tomato sauce.
Place under medium-high broiler for 10-12 minutes (or until slightly browned).
Baked Goat Cheese with Tomato Sauce {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Serve warm, with sliced French baguette or Crostinis.

Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 5 cups tomato sauce, or 10 - 12 servings

1/2 cup

Baked Goat Cheese and Tomato Sauce Appetizer {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of fresh, heirloom, roma or small, sweet tomatoes, crushed by hand, plus 1 cup water
  • 16 ounces strained tomatoes, or tomato puree
  • 1/2 small onion, chopped (optional)
  • 8 cloves
  • 1 heaping Tablespoon sugar
  • 3/4 - 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup Celery leaves, torn (optional)
  • 1/8 cup Basil leaves, torn
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, plus a sprinkle of capsicum pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons flour
  • 8 ounces soft goat cheese

Instructions

  1. Wash tomatoes, then crush by hand. Add one cup of water.
  2. Strain off and remove one cup of liquid, leaving remaining liquid with crushed tomatoes.
  3. In saucepan, combine crushed tomatoes, tomato puree, onion, basil, celery leaves, cloves, sugar, salt and pepper(s). Place over medium heat.
  4. Heat olive oil in skillet, add flour and whisk together over heat. Add the cup of "tomato" liquid. Combine over heat until slightly thickened.
  5. Add this mixture to the saucepan with tomatoes. Stir.
  6. Pour into shallow baking dish.
  7. Slice goat cheese and place on top of tomato sauce.
  8. Place under medium-high broiler for 10-12 minutes (or until slightly browned).
  9. Serve with sliced French baguette or Crostinis.

Notes

Recipe adapted from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press "Tomato Sauce"

Cheesy-Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

I love potatoes. I love them in any shape, form or fashion. 🙂 I suppose I come by my appreciation of them honestly, as potatoes were a standby in both my Grandmother’s kitchens. They had no food processors or fancy kitchen, equipment. Instead, they used simple methods and tools to prepare whatever delicious potato dish they made.

Mashed potatoes are every Amish woman’s culinary specialty. My old-order Amish grandmother used a potato ricer and masher, to make her mashed potatoes, and my new-order Amish grandmother (who had electricity), used her kitchen mixer.

In addition to mashed potatoes, Scalloped Potatoes are a standby on the meat-and-potato driven menus in Amish and Mennonite homes. My mother made them often, served alongside Baked Ham, Salisbury Steaks or Meatloaf. Yummy! Scalloped potatoes take a little over an hour to bake, so you’ll need to take that into consideration when preparing your meal. But it’s worth every minute of your time in the kitchen!

I’ve taken the liberty of modifying the recipe from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, by adding cheese and bacon. What’s not to love?!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

First, peel those potatoes. My mother always put them in water to keep them from browning, so I do the same.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Next, I fry the bacon in my favorite cast-iron skillet.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Now it’s time to gather all the ingredients, to prep for putting together your scalloped potato dish.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Slice the potatoes, using a knife, food processor or slicer.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Grease or butter your baking dish, and begin to assemble your ingredients. I like to make three layers, similar to putting together lasagna. Save the bacon and 1/3 of the cheese for the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

After everything but the bacon is in the pan, gently pour the hot milk over the top.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Top it all with your chopped bacon. Fifteen minutes before the dish has completed its cooking time, uncover it and sprinkle on the remaining cheese.

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Enjoy!

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Cheesy Bacon Scalloped Potatoes {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 6 cups raw potatoes, sliced thin
  • 4 Tablespoons flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 1/2 cups hot milk
  • 2 Tablespoons cold butter
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley (optional)
  • 1 onion (optional)
  • 6 slices bacon (optional)
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated (optional)
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease casserole dish with butter, or olive oil spray.
  2. Prep work: Peel and slice potatoes; Fry and chop bacon; Chop onion; Grate cheese; Slice butter; Heat milk.
  3. Place 1/3 of the potatoes in a layer on bottom of casserole. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and flour, and dot with butter.
  4. Add 1/3 of each of the optional ingredients to the layer, except for bacon. (Onion, cheeses, and parsley.)
  5. Continue layering all three layers. Do not put cheese on top layer just yet. If using bacon, place it on top now.
  6. Cover and bake at 350 for one hour. Uncover, place remaining cheese on top, and place back in oven for 15 additional minutes.
  7. Let rest for 20 or more minutes after removing from the oven. Serve with fresh chopped parsley.

 

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes}

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

I learned to make this recipe in my mother’s wonderful kitchen. As are most of the Amish recipes I’m sharing in this series, it’s an uncomplicated, straightforward dish, filled with simple and hearty flavors, for the entire family to enjoy. Although only the most sensitive of pallets would taste the rice in this recipe, it adds a texture which when baked resembles porcupine quills, making it an especially fun recipe for children. It’s delicious served with a salad and potatoes! I’ve always been fascinated with the name, so I did a little research. I found this interesting information on TheFoodTimeLine.org:

“Porcupine meatballs. The sort of easy, novelty recipe that appealed to cooks in the 30s, yet it appears to have been developed during World War I as a way to stretch meat. In Conservation Recipes (1918) compiled by the Mobilized Women’s Organizations of Berkeley and published by the Berkeley Unit, Council of Defence Women’s Committee, there is something called “Rice Meat Balls,” a clear forerunner of the recipes.”
—American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes fo the 20th Century, Jean Anderson [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1997 (p. 104)

I once that Native American Indians made a meatball with venison and wild rice. In addition, one of the processes of this recipe (soaking the breadcrumbs in milk), is clearly a Swedish thing. So it seems that not only the Amish culture, but many others in America can lay claim to this yummy meatball.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

First, tear stale or toasted bread into small pieces. This is a great job to set little helping hands to! (I like to use Ezekiel Bread.) Pour the milk over the bread crumbs, stir, and allow to soften.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

 

Place ground meat in bowl, (the recipe calls for ground beef, I like to use local, grass-fed beef, or turkey burger). Add salt and seasonings, egg, 1/2 cup uncooked rice, and onion. (The onion is optional, I add it to half the meatballs.) Mix together gently, taking care not to over-beat.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

The Mennonite Community Cookbook calls only for salt as a seasoning. In addition, I add black pepper, just a hint of cayenne pepper, paprika, parsley and basil.  I’ve seen other recipes that call for garlic and Worcestershire sauce, both would be great additions, if desired!

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

Not only do I add those seasonings to the porcupine meatball mixture, I add the same things to the waiting Tomato Juice which acts as a sauce. (If you don’t have tomato juice on hand, you can blend tomatoes, or use tomato sauce mixed with water, a 2 parts tomato sauce and 1 part water ratio.)

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.com

After forming the meatballs, place in a greased pan. Pour sauce over the meatballs.

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes} www.lydiaglick.comPlace in oven, bake covered for 45 minutes, and uncovered for remainder of time. Your Porcupine meatballs are ready to be served!

Porcupine Meatballs {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Yield: 8 meatballs

1 meatball

Ingredients

  • 1 pound hamburger (or turkey burger)
  • 4 slices bread
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 medium onion (chopped coarsely or fine, whichever your preference)
  • 1/4 cup uncooked rice (brown or white)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups tomato juice
  • *Optional seasonings: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper to meatballs and sauce, a dash of cayenne pepper to each, a dash of paprika to each, 1/2 teaspoon parsley to each, 1/2 teaspoon basil to each

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease baking dish.
  2. Crumble bread and soak in milk.
  3. Add beaten egg.
  4. Mix with other ingredients (except tomato juice).
  5. Add seasonings to meat mixture and to sauce. Mix/stir.
  6. Pour tomato juice over the meatballs.
  7. Bake covered for 45 minutes, and uncovered for 35-45 minutes, or until slightly browned.

Notes

Recipe source: Mabel Lehman; Mrs. Rueben Eberly; Mennonite Community Cookbook

References:

American Century Cookbook: The Most Popular Recipes fo the 20th Century, Jean Anderson [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1997 (p. 104)

TheFoodTimeline.org

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

One of the things I appreciate most about traditional Amish recipes is the simplicity of ingredients. Many of them can be made with things on hand in a well-stocked pantry, and require no trip to the grocery store. Another great fact is the cost-effectiveness for many of these recipes, such as previously shared Chicken Corn Soup, and Old-fashioned Apple Dumplings.

My Amish grandmothers made many varieties of delectable cookies, especially around the holidays. The recipe I’m sharing today is taken directly from the Mennonite Community Cookbook. These flour-free wafers are thin and crispy, with a slightly chewy center, making them a perfect pairing with tea or coffee!

The recipe can be made gluten free, simply by ensuring the oats you’re using are processed in a gluten-free location. (The packaging should inform you of this.) These cookies can also be dairy free, simply by substituting coconut oil for the butter.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

To make the Oatmeal Lace Wafers, begin by combining the butter and sugar. Beat with mixer. Add vanilla, then the eggs.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Beat these ingredients together till fluffy, making sure to scrape sides with spatula.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Combine oats with salt and baking powder. Stir well.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Add oat mixture to creamed mixture. Beat together until entirely combined.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Place small (not generous) teaspoonfuls onto greased baking sheet. (I like to use coconut oil spray.) Note from personal experience: If you make the cookies too large before baking, they will run together and you will have a hot mess on your hands, resembling one, giant cookie. 🙂 So be sure to control the cookie-dough size on your sheet!

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

Bake for 10-12 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool for a couple of minutes before removing from the tray.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookiels {Amish Family Recipes} | www.LydiaGlick.com

And there you have it! A delightful little, crispy, cookie – ready to be enjoyed with family and friends.

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 11 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 3 dozen cookies

Oatmeal Lace Wafer Cookies {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder

Instructions

  1. Cream together butter and sugar.
  2. Add vanilla.
  3. Add eggs and beat until fluffy
  4. Combine oats with salt and baking powder, then add to creamed mixture.
  5. Drop by (small, not generous) teaspoonfuls onto greased baking sheet, spaced about 2 to 3 inches apart.
  6. Bake at 375 for 12 minutes.
  7. Makes 3 dozen cookies.

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. L. Strong; Mennonite Community Cookbook, Herald Press

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

If you’re looking for a crumb coffee cake that’s not too sweet, and is delicious served in a bowl with milk or cream, this is it! It’s an easy alternative to sugary breakfast foods and is simple to make. It’s best when enjoyed hot, right out of the oven, and served with freshly brewed coffee.

The recipe in the Mennonite Community Cookbook  calls for regular flour, but in our home growing up with a health-conscious mama, we substituted fresh-ground, whole wheat flour. These days I like to use a combination of almond flour (or almond meal) and whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

The first step is sifting together the flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Cut in the shortening next. I use all natural coconut oil shortening alternative instead of typical shortening. After adding the shortening, reserve 1/2 cup of the crumb mixture and place to the side.

Add the baking powder and baking soda to the remaining crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Beat egg with a fork, add coffee and pour the liquid mixture into the flour crumbs.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Stir all ingredients together with a fork, do not over-mix. The mixture will be thick, unlike a standard cake batter. Pour into a greased pie plate, and even the batter gently by pressing down with your hands. Pour the nuts and reserved crumbs on top.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

The recipe directions call for baking the crumb cake at 400 for 30 minutes, but I find it needs a little less time (closer to 25 minutes) with almond flour/ whole wheat flour.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes} | LydiaGlick.com

Remove from the oven and serve warm! My favorite way to eat this crumb cake is in a bowl, covered with fresh milk or whipping cream.

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Coffee Crumb Cake {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup shortening
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup cold coffee
  • 1/3 cup chopped nuts

Instructions

  1. Sift all dry ingredients together, except soda and baking powder.
  2. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse corn meal.
  3. Reserve 1/2 cup of this mixture for topping.
  4. To remainder, add soda and baking powder and mix thoroughly with a fork.
  5. Beat egg, add coffee and combine with flour mixture.
  6. Pour into a 9 inch greased pie plate and sprinkle with the 1/2 cup of crumbs and chopped nuts.
  7. Bake at 400 for 30 minutes.
  8. "This is excellent when served with coffee for breakfast or lunch."

Notes

Recipe source: Mrs. Clayton Rohrer; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Modifications by Justina Dee: "I like to use a combination of whole wheat and almond flours, or sprouted grain flour in place of white flour. Also, I use coconut oil shortening, and I especially like pecans for the nuts."

 

 

 

 

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Some of my favorite foodie-memories are of the specialty canned goods and preserves my grandmothers and mother made. There’s one item that is particularly “Amish”, as I’ve never seen it anywhere but in the Amish-Mennonite community; and that is Chow Chow. What in the world is “Chow Chow”? It’s a relish of sorts, made with a variety of vegetables, vinegar, sugar and seasonings. The flavors are traditionally sweet and sour, but some cooks like to make a spicy variety! It is usually served as a side dish with traditional Amish meals, and brings a sweet and tangy flavor to the menu. There are many wonderful recipes to be found including raw and fermented, but today I am sharing one from the Mennonite Community Cookbook, first published in 1950.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Begin the process by washing and chopping your vegetables to the desired size.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Amish cooks use ingredients fresh from their garden. As with all traditional and simple recipes, the taste will always be best when using the freshest produce possible.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

My grandmother used not only green beans in her Chow Chow, but Lima beans, yellow wax beans and kidney beans as well. Yum, yum! As a small child, I helped her chop and mix the vegetables in her large, antique crock.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

After chopping the vegetables, cook them briefly. I combine the vegetables that require a longer time to cook in one pot, (such as lima beans, cauliflower and green beans) and the ones that cook quickly (onions, peppers and cucumbers) in another. All the vegetables should retain their crunchy texture, and only be cooked for a few minutes. Although the recipe does not call for it, I add a small amount of sea salt to the water while cooking them.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

While your vegetables are heating, combine the vinegar and seasonings, and cook together until the mixture comes to a boil. (I like to use apple cider vinegar and raw sugar.)

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Combine all the vegetables and mix together gently. Pack into jars, then distribute the boiling liquid you’ve prepared evenly into each one. Be sure to clean the tops of your jars so they can seal properly.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

Place prepared lids on jars, and lower into your canner. Bring water to a boil.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

My dear great-aunt Anna has a cookbook called “The Esh Family Cookbook”. I follow her canning directions Chow Chow, and cold pack my chow chow for 5 minutes after the water starts to boil.

Chow Chow Recipe | LydiaGlick.com | Amish Family Recipes

(This photo shows Chow Chow in one of my Grandma Esh’s delightful serving bowls.)

Place the jars on a shelf where everyone can enjoy their simple beauty as a work of kitchen-art, and enjoy this German sweet and sour delight! My grandmother always served her Chow Chow in beautiful dishes, no matter the occasion.

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Yield: 4 Quarts

Chow-Chow {Amish Family Recipes}

Ingredients

  • 1 quart cucumbers, diced
  • 1 quart string beans
  • 1 quart Lima beans
  • 1 quart corn
  • 1 pint celery
  • 1 pint green peppers
  • 1 pint red peppers
  • 1 cup small onions
  • 1 Tablespoon dry mustard
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 quart vinegar

Instructions

  1. Chop vegetables the desired size and cook separately.
  2. Cook until tender, not soft.
  3. Drain cooked vegetables and mix together.
  4. Combine sugar, mustard and vinegar.
  5. Bring to a boil.
  6. Add mixed vegetables to hot liquid and bring to a boiling point.
  7. Put into hot jars and seal.

Notes

Recipe source; Mrs. Olive Bergey, Souderton, PA. ; Mennonite Community Cookbook

Homemade Amish Bread {Whole Wheat}

Breadmaking

Summer break is over, our homeschool is back in session and it’s time to blog again! I want to share some of our summertime adventures with you, and can’t think of a better place to begin than bread making! Although our biological daughter already has lots of experience in the kitchen, our soon-to-be adopted daughter from Ukraine has spent the past ten years of her life in an orphanage, so she doesn’t yet have much knowledge in the area of cooking and baking. She’s a fast learner, and will be flying around the kitchen whipping things up in no time. 🙂

Mennonite Community Cookbook

As my mother grew up in an Amish home, one of the staple resources in our kitchen as I learned the art of cooking was the “Mennonite Community Cookbook”. It’s filled with treasured recipes from Amish-Mennonite homes all over North America. The bread featured here today comes straight from the pages of that cookbook, with exception – I substitute Olive Oil for Shortening. So, with no further ado, here’s the recipe!

Bread Ingredients

Whole Wheat Bread {Recipe from The Mennonite Community Cookbook, pages 3 & 11) Makes 2 small-medium loaves

1 cup scalded milk

1 cup hot water

1 yeast cake or package of active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)

1 Tablespoon salt

1/4 cup honey

3 Tablespoons olive oil

2 cups white flour

4 cups whole wheat flour

(*I use 6 cups of whole wheat flour, omitting the white flour the recipe calls for.)

Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup of the hot water.

Combine remaining 1/2 cup of water, olive oil, honey, salt and scalded milk in a large bowl.

When milk mixture has cooled to lukewarm temperature, add dissolved yeast.

Add flour gradually, making a dough stiff enough so that it can be easily handled.

Knead dough quickly and lightly until it is smooth and elastic. (I like to lightly dust my counter with flour, and knead dough directly on that surface – adding more flour if necessary to keep dough from sticking to counter.)

Place in greased bowl, cover with cloth and set in a warm place to rise.

Let rise until double in size. (About 1-2 hours.)

Divide in half, shape into loaves, place into two bread pans, brush lightly with olive oil or melted butter and allow to rise again until double in size.

Bake at 350 degrees F for 50-55 minutes.

Rising Bread

And there you have it. The tried, true and (many times) tested Amish Whole Wheat Bread recipe. Remove from pan, place on wire racks to cool, and enjoy one of our family favorites!

Fresh Homemade Bread

 

 

 

 

Homemade Blueberry Vanilla Cashew “Kind” Bars

 

Homemade Blueberry Vanilla Cashew "Kind" BarsOne of my favorite varieties of “Kind Bars” is their “Blueberry Vanilla & Cashew Bar”. Starbucks is our only local source for this yumminess, and we all know it’s not easy on the budget to visit that great spot on a daily basis. So I modified a recipe from Camilla’s awesome website “Power Hungry”, and my whole family is delighted with the result.

Homemade Blueberry Vanilla Cashew “Kind” Bars (makes approximately 16 bars)

  • 2 cups Cashews
  • 1/2 cup Almonds
  • 1/2 cup Dried Blueberries (*or any dried berries of your choice)
  • 3/4 cup Crisp (Brown) Rice Cereal
  • 2 (hearty) pinches Sea Salt
  • 1/2 cup Brown Rice Syrup (be sure your brown rice syrup is from a good source)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Coconut Oil (for pan)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Line a 9×13 pan (I use stoneware) with wax paper. Rub wax paper with small amount of coconut oil.

Put pre-measured cashews and almonds in ziplock bag and break/crush into smaller pieces using a rolling pin. Combine crushed nuts, dried berries, crisp rice cereal and sea salt in bowl. Measure brown rice syrup mix in the vanilla extract, then add this mixture to the nut combo. Stir well.

Place combined ingredients into lined pan, and press flat. (I put a piece of coconut “greased” wax paper on top, then press down using a container.) Bake for 18-20 minutes. Bars will still be soft and pliable. Cool for 15 minutes.

Remove from pan by lifting edges of the wax paper. Cut into desired size, wrap with wax paper and store in airtight container.

Enjoy!

~ Justina Dee

Many thanks again, to “Power Hungry” for the excellent recipe base. 

(Please scroll down for additional photos.)

Combine ingredients

Combine ingredients

Press into pan

Press into pan

Bake, cool, remove from pan and cut into desired size.

Bake, cool, remove from pan and cut into desired size.

We wrapped our bars in wax paper, and tied with a string. Such fun!

We wrapped our bars in wax paper, and tied with a string. Such fun!

Oven Baked Buffalo Wings {for the whole family}

Baked Buffalo Wings

Oven Baked Buffalo Wings is a main dish that every person in our family enjoys! The recipe source is one of my favorite cookbooks; Nourishing Traditions. I modified Sally Fallon’s “Sesame Buffalo Wings” recipe, as several people around our table aren’t fans of sesame seeds. It’s best to prep this dish either several hours or the night before you plan to bake it. There is no frying involved, but the marinade causes a delicious crispy outside, while the chicken remains tender and moist under the skin. Yummy!

Nourishing Traditions

Did you know eating chicken off the bones is an excellent way to get skeletal-healthy nutrients into your diet? So, eat your Buffalo Wings friends; they’re great for your joints! (But stick with the baked version – your body will thank you.) So, with no further ado, here’s the recipe!

Baked Chicken Wings

  • 24 chicken wings, separated at the joints (Trader Joe’s is a great source!)
  • 1/2 cup naturally fermented soy sauce (I use Bragg’s Liquid Aminos, available online or at many grocery stores)
  • 1/2 cup brown rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • Juice and grated rind of 2 (large) lemons
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and mashed
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • Cayenne Pepper – desired amount (the more, the spicier!)
  • 3 tablespoons melted butter

Mix soy sauce, vinegar, honey, lemon juice & rind and all the seasonings. Marinate buffalo wings in the mixture several hours or overnight. Remove from mixture and pat dry. Place in stainless steel baking pan, brush with butter and bake at 350 degrees about 1 1/4 hours. These are also great re-heated!

Enjoy,

~Justina Dee